Rebuilding Your Career Toolkit to Meet the Needs of Employers

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Despite an uncertain job market, many job seekers would like to believe they are qualified. However, it simply is not the case. Candidates are failing at the job search because they lack the qualifications that employers value.
A national online survey conducted by the Career Advisory Board established by DeVry University brings to light how job seekers can better position themselves by focusing on the attributes employers’ value most. The findings of the Job Preparedness Indicator conducted Sept. 6-12, 2011 by Harris Interactive revealed that employers are unable to find qualified candidates for open positions.
In fact, only 14 percent of the 540 hiring managers surveyed said that within the past three years “nearly all” or “most” job seekers have had the skills their company looks for in a potential employee.
However, most job seekers believe they have what it takes to succeed. More than half (56 percent) of the 734 adults looking for work who were surveyed are confident they know what qualifications are required for employment. In addition, 72 percent are confident they know how to present their skills during an interview.
“These findings highlight the striking gap between what skills hiring managers value in a candidate and how job seekers describe themselves. But some of the disconnect between hiring managers and job seekers is due to misconceptions about what is most important to the other party,” notes Dan Kasun, senior director of developer and platform evangelism at Microsoft Corporation and Career Advisory Board member. “Job seekers should utilize these findings to better calibrate the way they present themselves to employers.”
According to the study, hiring managers place the highest value on the following skills across all job levels (entry, middle and managerial):
1. Strategic perspective
2. High integrity
3. Global outlook
4. Strong base work ethic/dependable
5. Accountability
For those looking to enhance their marketability to employers, Career Advisory Board members offer the following actionable advice:

Remodel Your Career Toolkit to Meet the Needs of Employers

Despite an uncertain job market, many job seekers would like to believe they are qualified. However, it simply is not the case. Candidates are failing at the job search because they lack the qualifications that employers value.

A national online survey conducted by the Career Advisory Board [careeradvisoryboard.com] established by DeVry University brings to light how job seekers can better position themselves by focusing on the attributes employers value most. The findings of the Job Preparedness Indicator conducted Sept. 6-12, 2011 by Harris Interactive revealed that employers are unable to find qualified candidates for open positions.

Refueling the Tanks: Learning to Value Time Off

<b>Refueling the Tanks: Learning to Value Time Off</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Why do many Americans suffer from burnout, reduced productivity, diminished creativity, failed relationships, stress, depression, heart disease and stomach ulcers? The answer may be as simple as a failure to rest and relax.

America’s puritanical work ethic emphasizes effort and extra hours, but overscheduling can destroy creativity, not to mention mental and physical health. Consider Denmark, the world’s happiest country, according to independent studies from the University of Leicester and the University of Michigan. Danish workers receive 31 days of paid vacation each year — the most in the world.

American workers, on average, only accumulate 10 paid vacation days per year, which many employees skip. According to a Harris Interactive research group, Americans failed to take 438 million paid vacation days in 2007.

Working nonstop doesn’t make workers more productive. Instead, it hurts effectiveness. Relaxation clears frenetic energy from minds and bodies, dramatically improving mood and attitude. Taking time off helps workers regain their bearings, so that, when they return to work, they feel more focused and productive.

Darren Hardy, publisher and editorial director of SUCCESS Magazine, offers these tips to Americans who need to recharge their batteries:

* Rephrase “time off.” If you can’t handle the idea of taking time off, call your down time something else. Hardy calls his time off “Rejuvenation Time,” which sounds purposeful, productive and worthwhile.

* Schedule time for yourself. Mark vacation time on your calendar, then treat it like an unmoveable appointment with Oprah or the Queen of England. When you do take time off, turn off your e-mail and Blackberries.

* Declare when you’re going on vacation. Tell everyone what your doing and that you won’t be available.

* Measure your time off. Measure the number of times you eat dinner with you family, take naps, meditate, read for pleasure, watch movies and engage in activities that you enjoy. If you only have fun every once in awhile, concentrate on building more time for yourself into your busy schedule.

For more tips about balancing your work and personal life, visit www.SUCCESS.com.