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American Winemaking Family Continues with Next Generation

(NewsUSA) – Family businesses, large and small, are vital to the US economy. However, few family-owned businesses make it to the third or fourth generation of family ownership. CK Mondavi and Family has been successful because of its excellent quality, great value and family heritage. It’s also a family wine business remains committed to remaining family-owned even after almost seventy-five years. Today, the third, and now fourth generation family members are now at the helm of this US wine legacy, leading this wine brand into the future."CK Mondavi and Family wines are a tradition that has been in our family for four generations," says 4th generation Riana Mondavi."Passion has kept our family business going and I can say for all of us in this next generation, we are extremely humbled to carry on a wine legacy that was started by our great grandparents so long ago. We are also wholeheartedly committed to continuing the Mondavi family tradition for generations to come."Riana and other "G4" family members including Alycia Mondavi, Angelina Mondavi, Giovanna Mondavi, Lia Mondavi, and Lucio Mondavi, are continuing to steward the family’s winemaking institution as official brand ambassadors, the major shareholders of their family business. Two G4 members now serve as representatives on their Board of Directors. Their fathers, Marc Mondavi and Peter Mondavi, Jr., remain co-proprietors of the company, but this next generation of cousins is now more involved in the direction of the business.CK Mondavi and Family was started by their great grandparents, Cesare and Rosa Mondavi, Italians who turned a mid-western grape-shipping business into a wine legacy. Eventually, the G4’s grandfather, Peter Mondavi, Sr., took over the family business and continued to work tirelessly to ensure the business would be around for generations to come. Today, they continue to honor their grandfather’s legacy in everything they do.All of the G4 grew up on and around their family’s Napa Valley estate, learning the business from a very young age. They played tag in the vineyards, picked grapes at harvest, worked in the cellars, and came to love their family business. It’s no wonder that they are now playing a larger role and are being groomed to steward the company in to the future.Each member of the "G4" brings his own approach and expertise to the business. Their collective expertise encompasses a range of talent and skills that will benefit every part of the family business – winemaking, management, engineering, finance, marketing and sales. This next generation remains committed to continuing to produce consistently delicious everyday wines from grapes that are 100 percent sourced from California vineyards, and sustainable farming techniques and winemaking practices that are more typically found with expensive wines. They are the first and only wines that are 100 percent "Made in USA Certified."The G4 members of the iconic Mondavi family are in place to move the company forward while ensuring best wines and best practices with each bottle that carries their name.You can find them online at, or on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest and Instagram @CKMondaviWines.

Boat Insurance Basics May Help You Stay Afloat

(NewsUSA) – Having the proper insurance may not be the most exciting part of owning a boat, but being savvy matters; the right coverage saves money, time, and hassle in case of an emergency.As a new boating season gets underway, boat owners should know the basics of different types of insurance coverage, review their current plan, and be sure they have the one that best meets their needs.Some key areas of coverage to consider this season include:- Salvage savvy. No one wants to lose a boat, but if the worst happens, don’t assume salvage is part of your insurance policy.According to the Boat Owners Association of The United States (BoatUS), some boat insurers will subtract the cost of salvage from the boat’s insured value. That means owners receive reduced funds for repairs, or less money back if the boat is a total loss. So seek out a policy that offers salvage coverage separate, but equal to the hull-value coverage.- Consequential concerns. Consequential damage is a tricky area of boat insurance. Data from BoatUS indicate that about half of all sinkings occur when the boat is docked and a small part below the waterline fails, often as a result of wear and tear, corrosion, or inadequate maintenance.An insurance policy may not cover the failed part, but ensure that it covers "consequential damage," such as major repairs or the cost of the boat in cases of total loss in the wake of a failed part.This consequential damage coverage generally only applies to major or total losses. It’s typical, for example, to cover the immediate consequential damage resulting from any sinking, fire, explosion, demasting, collision or stranding.- Rescue review. On-water towing assistance is an element of some boat insurance policies, but understand what type is right for your needs.If you have only one boat, ask your insurance company whether it offers a towing service. Some companies, such as BoatUS, have their own towing fleet. Important questions for your insurance company: Who is providing the towing service, if not their own fleet? Is there 24-hour service? Will you have to pay out of pocket and seek reimbursement?For more tips and information to optimize your boat insurance, visit for quotes or contact marine insurance specialists at 800-283-2883. 

Life’s Biggest Moments Take Center Stage in New UP TV Series

(NewsUSA) – As warm weather approaches, so does wedding season, and family-focused entertainment network UP TV heads down the aisle with a pair of new, unscripted series set to debut this summer.The series, "Our Wedding Story," takes viewers inside the relationships between the brides and grooms. With exceptional and cinematic storytelling, viewers will get to live each couple’s love story – from the moment they met to the walk down the aisle.In "Crazy Beautiful Weddings," viewers go behind the scenes with busy wedding planner Lynzie Kent. Wedding planning is an art and a science, and Ms. Kent brings her style and people skills as she navigates diverse tastes, the couples’ visions and various venues, to create one-of-a-kind celebrations for her clients that will make the big day something to remember."On UP, our viewers have seen the families in our beloved series exploring new relationships, planning weddings and having kids," Amy Winter, executive vice present and general manager of UP TV, says in a statement announcing the shows."By greenlighting new series that focus on those specific life moments, we invite our audience to experience all of the joy and excitement that many different couples are going through as they share their personal journeys of life’s biggest moments," she says.The pair of wedding programs complement new episodes of two existing shows that highlight another one of life’s biggest moments – the journey to parenthood.This spring, UP premieres new episodes of its groundbreaking series, "Expecting," which follows expectant parents as they prepare for a new addition to the family. With no producers or camera crews, it is the first show that asks couples to turn the lens on themselves, to give the audience a peek into one of life’s most exciting and personal journeys – welcoming a child.Also premiering in April is "One Born Every Minute." The series takes viewers inside a hospital maternity unit to experience the joy, excitement and drama as babies are delivered.UP is available on DIRECTV, DISH, Verizon Fios, AT&T U-verse, Xfinity and local cable. For more information about the family-friendly programming and where you can find the channel, go to find more details on social media, check out UP TV on Facebook at, on Twitter on @Uptv, and on Instagram at UP_TV.

Scuba Diving Brings Health, Hope to Injured And Disabled

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Scuba diving can be an exotic and enriching activity, but for many, it can also be a therapeutic one.
The weightlessness of a water environment allows individuals with a range of injuries or disabilities to exercise, relax, have fun, and gain confidence. Children and adults with challenges including traumatic brain injuries, amputation, spinal cord injuries, cerebral palsy, and blindness can enjoy the physical and psychological benefits of scuba diving.
Diveheart, a nonprofit organization founded in 2001, trains thousands of volunteers and works with injured and disabled individuals across the world, in areas including the United States, Mexico,UK, Malaysia, Israel, Philippines and the Caribbean.
As Darrell Young, a Vietnam veteran who is paraplegic as the result of a spinal cord injury, explains in a testimonial on the Diveheart website, “Diving gives me a high expectancy of myself. It gives me a goal to accomplish knowing that when it comes to the finish line it doesn’t matter how I finish my dive, but the feeling of strength I gain from diving,” he says.
Diveheart relies on volunteers and donations to help provide adaptive diving and scuba therapy experiences at no cost to the participants. Most of the initial training and first diving experiences occur in school or community pools. Participants don’t even need to know how to swim to benefit from therapeutic scuba diving, and the learning curve is almost immediate, according to Diveheart’s website details.
Diveheart works to spread the word that diving is a real option with many benefits for the individuals affected with injuries and for the volunteers who get involved as “dive buddies.” The basic experience of being in the water with the support of a trained “dive buddy” can relieve pain, improve focus, and bring joy, according to Diveheart participants.
Diveheart also provides adaptive dive training for those who want to take the next step and become adaptive divers or dive buddies to help others.
Most Diveheart participants are eager for destination scuba-diving adventures once individuals are trained and comfortable with the scuba experience. Diveheart offers opportunities for fundraising and also works to find grants for those who struggle with the cost of a dive getaway.
In addition, Diveheart works with the science and medical communities to provide data and research opportunities on the benefits of therapeutic scuba diving for a range of medical conditions.
For more information on participating, volunteering, or donating, visit

More Buyers in The Market Means Certain Home Upgrades Can Pay Off

Don’t think of Millennials as just the early adopters of Uber. Think of them as the next generation of home buyers.

The newly released U.S. home ownership rate rose last year for the first time in just over a dozen years (it’s at 64.2 percent). This is driven mainly by the desire to own versus rent by the under-35 crowd who, to date, have been hesitant to commit for both financial and personal reasons.

6 Tips for Baby’s Immune Development

(NewsUSA) – Sponsored News – Those first few years of your baby’s life are filled with milestones, from their first giggle to their first wobbly steps. Though you can’t see it, something important is happening inside your baby as well. Their gut microbiome – the microbes and bacteria that live mainly in their tummy – is busy developing. Helping your baby develop a healthy microbiome can help support their immune and digestive health for life. Here’s an easy breakdown of six factors that help ensure the right microbes are introduced into your baby’s tummy at the right time. Hint: you can keep the dog! See full-sized image here. 

Cancer Research Focuses on Growing Tumor Cells Outside the Human Body

(NewsUSA) – One of the great barriers to improving the fight against cancer has been the problem of growing human cancer cells for drug testing so they behave as if they were inside the patient.To answer this, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to grow human tumors in mice. But mice are not human, so the tests often lead to dead ends. And while it’s possible to grow tumor cells in petri dishes, they rarely behave like actual cancers.But now this problem is being solved by a company called Precision Therapeutics Inc (NASDAQ:AIPT), formerly Skyline Medical Inc (NASDAQ:SKLN), and its partner, Helomics.Precision Therapeutics and Helomics, through a subsidiary named TumorGenesis, are pioneering an approach that takes cancer cells from a patient, then analyzes the tumors’ genes and proteins. That information is crucial because it guides the selection of nutrients and other substances that the cells need. The final step is putting the cancer cells not in a petri dish, but rather on a special scaffold that’s bathed in the nutrient-rich media.The result: "For the first time, it will be possible to grow tumors outside the body that closely mimic those in the body," explains Dr. Carl Schwartz, CEO of Precision Therapeutics.That, in turn, will bring major benefits for cancer treatment and drug discovery. Cancer is actually many thousands of different diseases, each with different underlying DNA mutations.That’s why drugs that are effective against one person’s ovarian cancer may fail utterly against another’s. But with the ability to grow the cancer cells from patients outside the body, doctors will be able to test drug combinations to discover what works before treating the patient, thus saving people from debilitating side effects from ineffective drugs.Equally important, pharmaceutical companies will have a far better and lower-cost way to test drug candidates than testing on mice. It’s yet another key step towards personalized cancer treatment that will give every patient a much better chance of long-term survival.

Planning for Your Final Years

(NewsUSA) – When it comes to the final years of life, communication and planning are the keys to ensuring that your life song hits the right note. A new survey conducted by Home Instead Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care network, found that 85 percent of surveyed seniors who have made plans for their final years agree that planning is a chance to decide how their life’s story ends.Planning ahead and involving adult children in the discussion can help guide important decisions and bring families closer together, while also reducing stress.The following tips can help with starting a plan for the final years:1. Consider personality and preferences. Where do you or your loved one want to spend your final years, months or days? If aging at home is the goal, there are many options for home care, including support offered by Home Instead Senior Care.2. Communicate with loved ones. It may be a difficult conversation to have, but it’s crucial. The Conversation Project ( offers tips for discussing end-of-life wishes.3. Identify people who can help plan. Developing relationships with financial planners, home care companies and funeral homes early on can give seniors and their loved ones peace of mind.4. Put finances in order. Meeting with a financial planner gives seniors and their loved ones the opportunity to prepare financially for the cost of care, funerals and other needs they will have. Genworth ( provides resources for long-term care and life insurance.5. Complete a personal planning guide. There are resources available to help you in the planning process. For example, Dignity Memorial offers a personal funeral planning guide. You can go to for more information.6. Create a bucket list. It’s never too late to follow your dreams. Plan a few fun goals to ensure that you achieve the things in life that matter most to you.Home Instead has compiled free resources to aid in planning the final years. The site includes a music generator to help seniors and families think about what steps to take to be better prepared for this journey.To get started on your plan, visit 

Virtual Colonoscopy Is Becoming a Reality for More People

(NewsUSA) – Colorectal cancer deaths are slowly declining, but shocking racial and ethnic disparities remain.According to the American Cancer Society, Latinos living in the United States are more likely to develop and die from this disease than those in many Central and South American countries. African-Americans are at least 41 percent more likely to die from colorectal cancer than whites.Both groups are also less likely to get screened, and their cancers are often found later.What can be done?A growing number of medical groups, patient advocates and members of Congress say virtual colonoscopy – known medically as CT colonography – can overcome cultural stigmas and anxiety associated with this screening."CT colonography can attract those who would otherwise not be screened, allow doctors to remove more polyps before they become cancers and help people avoid getting this disease," says Carolyn R. ("Bo") Aldigé, president and founder of the Prevent Cancer Foundation.The evidence is thereVirtual colonoscopy is an American Cancer Society-recommended screening exam. Studies show that it is as accurate as standard colonoscopy in most people – including those 65 and older.Virtual colonoscopy increases screening rates where it is offered in the U.S. and abroad. Former President Obama chose to have the virtual exam.Michael Sapienza, President and CEO of the Colon Cancer Alliance, says the virtual exam can "jump-start screening by offering access to a less-invasive option that millions of screening age who choose not to be tested find more appealing."Unfortunately, the prep is the sameHowever, the virtual exam is far less invasive than standard colonoscopy. The CT scanner uses low-dose X-rays to make 3-D, moving images of the colon that doctors examine for polyps and cancer.The test does not require sedation. It is over in minutes. And you may not need someone to drive you to the exam. Afterward, you can go back to daily activities.Private insurers are starting to listenThirty-six states require that insurance policies sold in their state cover virtual colonoscopy. Insurers who take part in federal exchanges are required under the Affordable Care Act to cover the exam. CIGNA, UnitedHealthcare, Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Aetna and other insurers cover these tests irrespective of ACA requirements.Challenges remain for Medicare patientsScreening those on Medicare with virtual colonoscopy may cost nearly a third less than standard colonoscopy. Yet, Medicare is among a shrinking number of insurers that does not cover the test."We need more Medicare-covered options, including CT colonography, to increase Hispanic screening rates and save lives," says Elena V. Rios, MD, MSPH, president and chief executive officer of the National Hispanic Medical Association.Patient and provider groups want Congress to pass a new bill that would provide Medicare coverage for virtual colonoscopy."With Medicare coverage, CT colonography can increase screening and reduce unnecessary deaths," says Judy Yee, MD, chair of the American College of Radiology Colon Cancer Committee.Find more information on virtual colonoscopy (CT colonography) at