Planning for Comfort During Long Road Trips

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Road trips can provide a great source of tunes, good conversation and relaxation throughout any travel season. However, long hours on the road can often result in body aches, poor nutrition and other challenges for drivers stuck behind the wheel.
To avoid such pitfalls and make the experience a bit less taxing on the body, champion Porsche race car driver Patrick Long has developed a set of guidelines for drivers everywhere. Long, an American Le Mans Series race car driver who can be in his car for up to 12 hours at a time, recommends these tips for any kind of distance driving:
Fuel-Up: If you pack a small cooler with water bottles and healthy snacks like fruits and veggies, this can deter the temptation to reach for non-healthy items on the road.
Stability: Stability should be your number-one concern when taking a long road trip. Many people stick pillows behind their backs for lumbar support, but the main goal is to always have your spine straight. Sit with the seat fully contacting your back; allow the structure of the seat to do its job in supporting your spine.
Body Positioning: Maintain proper posture by not leaning one way or the other in the seat. According to the National Highway and Traffic Safety Authority, a driver’s hands should both be placed on the outside of the steering wheel on opposite sides. Long recommends the “9 and 3” hand position. Having proper position in the car is also relative to the pedals — if you’re too close you’re cramped. If you’re too far away, you’ll end up slouching down to reach them. Sit close enough to the wheel so there’s a slight bend at your elbows and keep your arms relaxed.
Take Frequent Pit Stops: For longer-distance road adventures, take frequent pit stops in order to stretch your legs and improve the blood flow in your body. To prevent a sore lower back experienced after driving, focus on core stability and strength exercises. Long suggests planks, leg lifts and crunches on an exercise ball to strengthen your core.
To find more information about Long, check out www.porsche.com/usa.

Don’t Let Lack of Comfort Cramp Your Road Trip

Road trips can provide a great source of tunes, good conversation and relaxation throughout any travel season. However, long hours on the road can often result in body aches, poor nutrition and other challenges for drivers stuck behind the wheel.

To avoid such pitfalls and make the experience a bit less taxing on the body, champion Porsche race car driver Patrick Long has developed a set of guidelines for drivers everywhere. Long, an American Le Mans Series race car driver who can be in his car for up to 12 hours at a time, recommends these tips for any kind of distance driving:

Prepare Your Vehicle for Fall

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Road trips can provide a great source of tunes, good conversation and relaxation throughout any travel season. However, long hours on the road can often result in body aches, poor nutrition and other challenges for drivers stuck behind the wheel.
To avoid such pitfalls and make the experience a bit less taxing on the body, champion Porsche race car driver Patrick Long has developed a set of guidelines for drivers everywhere. Long, an American Le Mans Series race car driver who can be in his car for up to 12 hours at a time, recommends these tips for any kind of distance driving:
Fuel-Up: If you pack a small cooler with water bottles and healthy snacks like fruits and veggies, this can deter the temptation to reach for non-healthy items on the road.
Stability: Stability should be your number-one concern when taking a long road trip. Many people stick pillows behind their backs for lumbar support, but the main goal is to always have your spine straight. Sit with the seat fully contacting your back; allow the structure of the seat to do its job in supporting your spine.
Body Positioning: Maintain proper posture by not leaning one way or the other in the seat. According to the National Highway and Traffic Safety Authority, a driver’s hands should both be placed on the outside of the steering wheel on opposite sides. Long recommends the “9 and 3” hand position. Having proper position in the car is also relative to the pedals — if you’re too close you’re cramped. If you’re too far away, you’ll end up slouching down to reach them. Sit close enough to the wheel so there’s a slight bend at your elbows and keep your arms relaxed.
Take Frequent Pit Stops: For longer-distance road adventures, take frequent pit stops in order to stretch your legs and improve the blood flow in your body. To prevent a sore lower back experienced after driving, focus on core stability and strength exercises. Long suggests planks, leg lifts and crunches on an exercise ball to strengthen your core.
To find more information about Long, check out www.porsche.com/usa.

Steve McQueen Rides Into a Renaissance

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Hollywood legend Steve McQueen, known as the “King of Cool,” is best known for the 1960’s films “Bullitt” and “The Great Escape.” He was named one of the “greatest movie stars of all time” by Entertainment Weekly. Today, he is seeing a resurgence in popularity nearly 30 years after his untimely passing, including the development of a new TV special based on his love for motorcycles and fast cars.

Born to an alcoholic mother and abandoned by his father, McQueen overcame early beginnings as a petty criminal to become a race-car driver, actor and father to two children. McQueen never lost his adventurous streak, often performing his own action stunts in his films. Of his past, McQueen once said, “If I hadn’t made it as an actor, I might have wound up a hood.”

While McQueen died in 1980, he is more popular than ever, inspiring cars, motorcycles, books, movies, designer clothing and a whole new generation of fans.

The successful coffee table book “McQueen’s Machines,” which chronicles McQueen’s love for cars and motorcycles, and his private collections of both, is being developed into a television special targeted for release next year.

To celebrate the 40th anniversary of the “Bullitt” film, last year Ford released a new Mustang Bullitt to pay homage to one of McQueen’s biggest starring roles. Meanwhile, Metisse has introduced a limited-edition Desert Racer motorcycle, a replica of the bike owned and used by Steve McQueen for competitive racing, faithfully reproduced by hand and authorized by the McQueen estate.

The desire among his legions of fans for all things McQueen reached new heights recently as his Ferrari sold at auction for a whopping $1.6 million. TAG Heuer, Ballentine’s and Dolce & Gabbana have all made lucrative forays into high fashion with McQueen branded products.

“McQueen is a legend that many of today’s celebrities would love to emulate, but few do,” said Diana Brobmann, an expert at a celebrity branding and licensing firm called GreenLight. “He has an enduring appeal and symbolizes masculinity, adventure and pure guts.”

For additional information about Steve McQueen, visit his official Web site at www.stevemcqueen.com.