Employee-Friendly Office Cultures Improve Retainment

Today’s economy isn’t just frustrating for those without jobs – limited budgets can do a number on employed workers’ morale as well. Exemplary employees might not be awarded with raises, no matter how much effort they put into their projects. Employers unable to afford larger salaries may find their best employees looking elsewhere.

But some companies are finding way to keep employees happy by cultivating employee-friendly office cultures. For example, in the fall of 2010, Washington, D.C.’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer implemented a Results Only Work Policy (ROWE), which pays employees  for results, not the hours  that they work. This means that employees are able to work when or wherever they want, so long as their work gets done. In places where it has been tried, ROWE not only boosts morale and retention, but also improves output.

Companies Seek Happy Employees

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Today’s economy isn’t just frustrating for those without jobs -; limited budgets can do a number on employed workers’ morale as well. Exemplary employees might not be awarded with raises, no matter how much effort they put into their projects. Employers unable to afford larger salaries may see their best employees looking elsewhere.
But some companies are finding way to keep employees happy by cultivating employee-friendly office cultures. For example, in the fall of 2010, Washington, D.C.’s Office of the Chief Technology Officer implemented a Results Only Work Policy (ROWE), which pays employees for results, not the hours that they work. This means that employees are able to work when or wherever they want, so long as their work gets done. In places where it has been tried, ROWE not only boosts morale and retention, but also improves output.
Of course, not every company is willing to redo its entire work structure. That doesn’t mean that they can’t find less drastic ways to boost morale. Here are some of the many ways that companies can make the workplace more attractive for employees:
* Acknowledge employees’ contributions. Employees who work hard without recognition are likely to lose morale. Even if a company can’t provide raises, managers can give out certificates or plaques acknowledging an employee’s accomplishments or designating an employee of the month. Plaquemaker Plus, a company that offers many personalized trophies, plaques and frames, offers laser-engraved and full-color plaques that can be used to give hard-working employees a boost. Visit their website at www.PlaquemakerPlus.com or call 1-800-367-5556.
* Celebrate birthdays. Acknowledging employees’ personal lives will make them feel like valuable team members, rather than replaceable automatons.
* Communicate. Unhappy employees are less productive, so managers should take time to speak with them about questions or concerns. An anonymous employee survey can also help employers determine where they need improvement.

Tips to Plan a Fun Family Reunion

As extended families spread out throughout the country, it becomes more difficult to get everyone together. Holding a family reunion, then, gives everyone a chance to meet, catch-up and learn a little more about their family history.

Arranging a reunion can be a massive undertaking, and it’s easy to become overwhelmed. But with a little planning, anyone can pull off a successful family reunion.

Follow these tips to ensure a fun, rewarding family reunion experience:

Tips to Plan a Fun Family Reunion

As extended families spread out throughout the country, it becomes more difficult to get everyone together. Holding a family reunion, then, gives everyone a chance to meet, catch-up and learn a little more about their family history.
But arranging a reunion can be a massive undertaking, and it’s easy to become overwhelmed.  However, with a little planning, anyone can pull off a successful family reunion.
Follow these tips to ensure a fun, rewarding family reunion experience:
•    Create a family reunion committee. You will need at least two people to plan location, food, activities, budget, mailings, payments and record-keeping. The better organized your committee, the more smoothly your reunion will run. You can never start planning too early – you will need to start at least a year ahead of time
•    Pick a theme. Designing your reunion around a theme can make planning activities, food and decorations more creative. Family history themes, such a celebrating an anniversary, a birthday or a cultural heritage – a Mexican fiesta, for example – are always popular.
•    Develop a budget. Your budget will influence the rest of your decisions regarding housing, food and activities. When in doubt, plan for affordability – as much fun as a Caribbean cruise might be, it’s unlikely that every family member can afford to attend.
•    Plan housing. If possible, choose a location that offers a range of lodging choices. National parks, for example, often have hotels nearby and may have cabins or tent-camping available, giving your guests plenty of options.
•    Keep the kids entertained. Don’t presume that the grandparents or teenagers will act as babysitters for the whole reunion. Ask for volunteers, and rotate babysitting duties. Arranging competitions, like three-legged and costume races, will keep kids happy. You can even present the winner with a trophy – Plaquemaker Plus offers a variety of trophies, including “Trophy Dudes” with bendable arms and legs.
•    Create activities. Adults might be content to sit around and chatter, but integrating the whole family can be a challenge. Try giving each family member a family tree to fill out, or arrange a friendly game of family trivia. And don’t forget to take a family photo. Plaquemaker Plus can even create heirloom-quality wooden plaques or acrylic images, so you can offer a unique souvenir to any family member who wants one.

Tips to Plan a Fun Family Reunion

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – As extended families spread out throughout the country, it becomes more difficult to get everyone together. Holding a family reunion, then, gives everyone a chance to meet, catch-up and learn a little more about their family history.

But arranging a reunion can be a massive undertaking, and it’s easy to become overwhelmed. However, with a little planning, anyone can pull off a successful family reunion.

Follow these tips to ensure a fun, rewarding family reunion experience:

* Create a family reunion committee. You will need at least two people to plan location, food, activities, budget, mailings, payments and record-keeping. The better organized your committee, the more smoothly your reunion will run. You can never start planning too early -; you will need to start at least a year ahead of time * Pick a theme. Designing your reunion around a theme can make planning activities, food and decorations more creative. Family history themes, such a celebrating an anniversary, a birthday or a cultural heritage -; a Mexican fiesta, for example -; are always popular.

* Develop a budget. Your budget will influence the rest of your decisions regarding housing, food and activities. When in doubt, plan for affordability -; as much fun as a Caribbean cruise might be, it’s unlikely that every family member can afford to attend.

* Plan housing. If possible, choose a location that offers a range of lodging choices. National parks, for example, often have hotels nearby and may have cabins or tent-camping available, giving your guests plenty of options.

* Keep the kids entertained. Don’t presume that the grandparents or teenagers will act as babysitters for the whole reunion. Ask for volunteers, and rotate babysitting duties. Arranging competitions, like three-legged and costume races, will keep kids happy. You can even present the winner with a trophy -; Plaquemaker Plus (www.plaquemakerplus.com) offers a variety of trophies, including “Trophy Dudes” with bendable arms and legs.

* Create activities. Adults might be content to sit around and chatter, but integrating the whole family can be a challenge. Try giving each family member a family tree to fill out, or arrange a friendly game of family trivia. And don’t forget to take a family photo. Plaquemaker Plus can even create heirloom-quality wooden plaques or acrylic images, so you can offer a unique souvenir to any family member who wants one.

Gifts That Celebrate the Moment, Look to the Future

<b>Gifts That Celebrate the Moment, Look to the Future</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Graduation is both a mark of accomplishment and the beginning of a transition — either from high school to college or from college to working life. Graduation gifts, then, should both commemorate the graduate’s success and look to the future.

PlaqueMaker Plus (Plaquemakerplus.com), a Web site that people can visit to design their own gifts and plaques, signs, trophies, badges and awards, offers the following graduation gift ideas:

* A post-graduation kit. For a high-school graduate, put together a gift basket of items appropriate for dorm life, such as a bathrobe, gift certificates for coffee or pizza, a laundry hamper and other necessary supplies. For a college graduate, purchase an item related to their new career. For example, an art major might appreciate a set of high-quality sketch books or drawing pencils, while a business major might appreciate a nice briefcase.

* Buy something for the graduate’s desk. A high-school graduate can use any desk supplies to study, while a college graduate can place items like paperweights on their office desk. An engraved pen holder will make a memorable addition to any desk. PlaqueMaker Plus makes it fast and easy for customers to custom engrave a name, date and personal message on a wooden pen holder that includes a pen set, clock and business card holder. PlaqueMaker Plus also makes custom desk plates.

* Commemorate the moment with a framed photograph. Each graduation only happens once, so frame a photograph from the occasion so the graduate can keep it as a memento. With PlaqueMaker Plus’ Clear Memories Line, you can engrave a personal message, such as a poem, and embed a photograph into heirloom-quality acrylic.

* Buy a book. Your graduate may want a break from studying, but the right book can provide a touching message that will stay with him or her. Dr. Seuss’ “Oh, the Places You’ll Go” is a popular choice for a reason. Other good books for graduates include books that will help them survive on their own, like “The Joy of Cooking,” or books that will help with job hunts, such as “What Color Is Your Parachute” by Richard Nelson Bolles.