Rebuilding Your Career Toolkit to Meet the Needs of Employers

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Despite an uncertain job market, many job seekers would like to believe they are qualified. However, it simply is not the case. Candidates are failing at the job search because they lack the qualifications that employers value.
A national online survey conducted by the Career Advisory Board established by DeVry University brings to light how job seekers can better position themselves by focusing on the attributes employers’ value most. The findings of the Job Preparedness Indicator conducted Sept. 6-12, 2011 by Harris Interactive revealed that employers are unable to find qualified candidates for open positions.
In fact, only 14 percent of the 540 hiring managers surveyed said that within the past three years “nearly all” or “most” job seekers have had the skills their company looks for in a potential employee.
However, most job seekers believe they have what it takes to succeed. More than half (56 percent) of the 734 adults looking for work who were surveyed are confident they know what qualifications are required for employment. In addition, 72 percent are confident they know how to present their skills during an interview.
“These findings highlight the striking gap between what skills hiring managers value in a candidate and how job seekers describe themselves. But some of the disconnect between hiring managers and job seekers is due to misconceptions about what is most important to the other party,” notes Dan Kasun, senior director of developer and platform evangelism at Microsoft Corporation and Career Advisory Board member. “Job seekers should utilize these findings to better calibrate the way they present themselves to employers.”
According to the study, hiring managers place the highest value on the following skills across all job levels (entry, middle and managerial):
1. Strategic perspective
2. High integrity
3. Global outlook
4. Strong base work ethic/dependable
5. Accountability
For those looking to enhance their marketability to employers, Career Advisory Board members offer the following actionable advice:

Remodel Your Career Toolkit to Meet the Needs of Employers

Despite an uncertain job market, many job seekers would like to believe they are qualified. However, it simply is not the case. Candidates are failing at the job search because they lack the qualifications that employers value.

A national online survey conducted by the Career Advisory Board [careeradvisoryboard.com] established by DeVry University brings to light how job seekers can better position themselves by focusing on the attributes employers value most. The findings of the Job Preparedness Indicator conducted Sept. 6-12, 2011 by Harris Interactive revealed that employers are unable to find qualified candidates for open positions.

Navigating a Relationship With a Recruiter

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – In a weak economy with fewer available employment opportunities, job seekers must employ advanced tactics to stand apart from their competitors. Professional third-party recruiters — sometimes called “headhunters” — can help job seekers find positions that match their skill set and circulate their resume among hiring managers.
Recruiters are experts hired by companies to identify the best candidates for available positions. Their relationship with job seekers is mutually beneficial; recruiters need job seekers to fill positions, while job seekers want access to employers. To maximize the potential of this relationship, job seekers must understand recruiters and their role in the employment process.

Navigating Your Relationship With a Recruiter

In a weak economy with fewer available employment opportunities, job seekers must employ advanced tactics to stand apart from their competitors. Professional third-party recruiters – sometimes called “headhunters” – can help job seekers find positions that match their skill set and circulate their resume among hiring managers.

Recruiters are experts hired by companies to identify the best candidates for available positions. Their relationship with job seekers is mutually beneficial; recruiters need job seekers to fill positions, while job seekers want access to employers. To maximize the potential of this relationship, job seekers must understand recruiters and their role in the employment process.

Understanding the Realities of Graduate School

According to a 2009 study by the U.S. Census Bureau, less than 5 percent of the U.S. population has a graduate degree. The post-recession economy has placed increased pressure on job-seekers and working professionals to join this minority and gain a leg up on the competition. However, many prospective graduate students still need assistance in deciding whether they should attend graduate school.

“In today’s competitive job market, candidates need to add value to their prospective employer’s business and tell them exactly how they intend to do it,” said Nelly C. Leon, M.S., senior career advisor at DeVry University. “Many would argue that master’s degree holders are more proficient at delivering that value.”

Gripping the Realities of Graduate School

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – According to a 2009 study by the U.S. Census Bureau, less than 5 percent of the U.S. population has a graduate degree. The post-recession economy has placed increased pressure on job-seekers and working professionals to join this minority and gain a leg up on the competition. However, many prospective graduate students still need assistance in deciding whether they should attend graduate school.
“In today’s competitive job market, candidates need to add value to their prospective employer’s business and tell them exactly how they intend to do it,” said Nelly C. Leon, M.S., senior career advisor at DeVry University. “Many would argue that master’s degree holders are more proficient at delivering that value.”
Nevertheless, before prospective grad students begin forecasting the potential salary and prestige an advanced degree may bring, it is important that they consider why they want the degree and how they will utilize it to get ahead.
“Some students want a graduate degree to help them launch their own business, while others are more concerned with accelerating their career trajectory or becoming a better manager,” said Eddie R. Wachter, Ph.D., dean of academic affairs at DeVry University. “Potential graduate students need to decide how their desired degree will help them become a more competent and respected leader.”
It is imperative that professionals consider the following:
How will a graduate degree help me? Many job-seekers aspire to earn a graduate degree without analyzing the most-needed skills in their industry. A graduate degree, in itself, does not bring opportunity. It is important to gauge where a graduate degree will be beneficial and how it should be utilized.
What type of graduate program do I need? Program offerings are a vital component of this decision. Prospective students should ask themselves the following: Do I need to work full-time while enrolled? Do I need a school with year-round evening and weekend classes as well as flexible online degree options so I can finish quickly? Schools such as DeVry University give students the chance to earn a master’s degree on a personalized schedule without affecting their lifestyle.
Will my graduate education pay off? Many job-seekers neglect researching how long it will take them to pay for their education. While some employers offer tuition reimbursement programs, many graduate students pay for their own education. Earning a graduate degree must benefit the student both professionally and financially.
How will I balance my schedule? Balancing responsibilities is challenging without the added pressure of pursuing a master’s degree. Prospective students should establish a support system to help them balance the demands of higher education.
Prospective graduate students need to honestly weigh all of their options and motivations while deciding whether to pursue a graduate degree. However, with proper planning, a graduate degree can catapult professionals to new career heights, reveal exciting growth opportunities and give young professionals and their business a clear competitive advantage.

How to Manage Your Time During a Job Search

We’ve all heard that “finding a job is a full-time job,” but what is the most effective way to manage that time? For most job seekers, the goal is to find the best job as quickly as possible, but it can be difficult to implement this plan every day.

To make the most of valuable time, below are recommendations on expediting the process so job seekers can stop searching and start working: