Simple Tips to Control Irritable Bowel Syndrome

As many as 50 million Americans suffer from the cramping, bloating, constipation, abdominal pain and diarrhea that go along with Irritable
Bowel Syndrome. According to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, the digestive disorder mainly targets women: Between 60 and 65 percent of sufferers are female.

Despite the overwhelming number of Americans affected, there is no cure for IBS. But while no magic pill exists, the best way to treat IBS symptoms is through tried-and-true methods of healthy eating, exercise, and stress management. Here are 5 simple ways to ease your suffering:

5 Tips for IBS Relief

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – As many as 50 million Americans suffer from the cramping, bloating, constipation and diarrhea that go along with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. According to the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders, the digestive disorder mainly targets women: Between 60 and 65 percent of sufferers are female.
Despite the overwhelming number of Americans affected, there is no cure for IBS. But while no magic pill exists, the best way to treat IBS symptoms is through tried-and-true methods of healthy eating, exercise, and stress management. Here are five simple ways to ease your suffering:
Keep a food diary. Many people find that their signs and symptoms worsen when they eat certain foods. For instance, chocolate, milk and alcohol might cause constipation or diarrhea. Keeping a food diary for a few weeks may be a good way to find out if a food bothers you. Record what you eat and what your symptoms are. If you notice a pattern or think a food makes you feel worse, don’t eat it.
Fiber up. Increasing fiber into your diet may help improve how your intestines work. The key is to do it slowly: Some people feel bloated and have gas if they increase their fiber intake too quickly. The best way to increase your fiber intake is to eat a wide variety of high-fiber foods like beans, oatmeal, popcorn and whole-wheat bread.
Manage your stress. Many IBS sufferers feel that stress seems to trigger IBS episodes. Identify certain events or situations that bring on symptoms, and develop ways of dealing with these situations. An activity like yoga or hypnosis can provide a break from stressful situations, and psychiatrists and psychologists can provide additional methods for coping with stress.
Get moving. A recent report in the American Journal of Gastroenterology found that IBS sufferers who did moderate activity three to five times per week for 20 to 30 minutes a session experienced greater symptom relief.
Add a supplement. For most patients, the best therapy for IBS is the most simple. A recent study in the British Medical Journal found that peppermint oil was the most effective therapy for IBS, providing relief for 40 percent of patients. The dietary supplement Complete Relief has harnessed the power of peppermint, creating softgels that effectively relieve discomfort. Complete Relief stands out from other peppermint products because of its “controlled-release” coating that ensures the full dose is not released until the softgel has entered your digestive tract. This is where gas and bloating occur and where Complete Relief begins to work.
For more information, visit www.syncom.net.

Is Your Child’s Packed Lunch Healthy?

Every time you pack your kids’ lunches, you have an opportunity to give them a fun, healthy meal. Are you making the most of it?

Janice Newell Bissex, MS, RD and Liz Weiss, MS, RD, authors of the book No Whine with Dinner, along with the California Raisin Marketing Board, offer the following tips for better lunches:

•    Take a Lunchbox Assessment. Look at your children’s lunches. Healthy lunches should include whole grains, such as whole-wheat bread, pitas or tortillas; high-quality lean protein, such as roasted deli turkey, beans or tofu; low-fat dairy, such as low-fat milk, yogurt, cheese and calcium-fortified soy milk; and fruits and vegetables, such as sliced apples, strawberries, California raisins, sliced bell pepper strips, baby carrots or raw green beans.

Fight Against Childhood Obesity Begins at Home

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Schools nationwide are revamping their lunch menus, celebrity chefs are going on reality TV and First Lady Michelle Obama has started a health initiative, all to combat the same thing — childhood obesity.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 25 million American children are obese or overweight, setting them up for a lifetime of health problems, including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Many school systems have made attempts to provide healthier school lunches, such as offering salad bars or fresh fruit.

Food and drink makers are also making efforts to solve the problem. Companies like Coca-Cola have removed regular soft drinks from schools, and recently, major beverage companies, together with the William J. Clinton Foundation and the Alliance for a Healthier Generation, announced that they have successfully cut total calories from drinks delivered to schools by 88 percent over the last three years.

“From my experience, schools alone cannot stop children from becoming overweight or obese,” says registered dietitian Sylvia Klinger. “It is very important for parents to make an effort to encourage healthy eating habits at home and outside of the classroom.”

Klinger suggests these tips for parents who want their children to live healthy, active lives:

* Make healthy foods easy. We’re all familiar with the phrase “eat the rainbow.” To make it easy to get your family to eat fresh fruits and vegetables, chop bite-sized portions in advance, so you can take them out of the fridge and run. Sneak fruits into smoothies, and veggies into sauces, salsas or soups. Also, look for individually packaged whole-grain products, like 100 percent whole wheat bread, oatmeal and brown rice.

* Create healthy eating habits. Always eat breakfast — children who eat breakfast not only weigh less, but also perform better in school. It is also important to schedule regular meal times. Try involving your children in the preparation of each meal. Avoid the clean plate system, which only promotes overeating. Also, don’t ban treats, which can encourage sneaking food or overeating when sweets are present.

* Get active. Exercise is important regardless of your child’s weight or age. If your child is overweight, focus on maintaining that weight while the child grows in height, which can be accomplished through exercise. No matter your child’s size, activities like team sports, swimming, hiking, cycling or just taking a family walk can help manage weight, increase energy and improve self-esteem.

Revamp Your Pantry For Healthier Meals

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – In an ideal world, you’d shop every day for the freshest ingredients to make gourmet meals for your family. However, family obligations keep you so busy that dinner often means fast food or take-out.

Fortunately, there is a happy medium between healthfulness and convenience. With a well-stocked pantry, it’s easy and less expensive to create healthy meals in minutes without extra trips to the grocery store.

Elizabeth Ward, a registered dietitian and nutrition book author, provides these tips for creating the perfect pantry:

* Keep supplies for healthy last-minute meals on hand. Pantry staples like whole-wheat pasta, eggs, tomato sauce, canned tuna fish, peanut butter, canned salmon and canned beans (such as black beans and garbanzos) can make quick and healthy sandwiches, soups, omelets and more.

* Stock up on natural foods. Many common pantry supplies, like canned soups, crackers and sugary cereals, contain large amounts of high-fructose corn syrup, trans fats and sodium. Choose more nutritious alternatives. For example, start off your day with a healthy breakfast including Mom’s Best Naturals (www.momsbestnaturals.com) cereals. This line comes in delicious family favorite varieties, and unlike a lot of natural/organic cereals, this brand is affordably priced so it’s a good, budget-friendly option for families.

* Choose whole grains. Oatmeal, whole wheat bread and brown rice are healthy staples, but you can also create quick, easy meals and side dishes from grains like bulgur wheat, buckwheat, quinoa and whole wheat couscous. Snack on popcorn (a whole grain) instead of fatty chips, and make a delicious trail mix with whole grain cereal, dried fruit and nuts.

* Spice it up. With a well-stocked spice rack, you can prepare simple dishes such as beans and rice with an Indian, Mexican or Mediterranean flare. Stock dried rosemary, thyme, tarragon, dill, cumin, cinnamon, sage, chili powder, turmeric, bay leaves, curry powder, garlic powder, onion powder and black and red pepper. Toss dried herbs and spices after a year, as their flavor fades.

For more tips on healthy eating from Elizabeth Ward, please visit her blog at http://momsbestnaturals.com/blogs/moms-best-blog/.