Tips to Protect Yourself Against Mosquitos and West Nile Disease

Although national consumer confidence has risen in recent months, the recession is still significantly affecting homeowners. While foreclosure figures underscore the current economic conditions, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) reminds homeowners that vacated homes are prone to mosquito infestations, especially in or around foreclosed properties with clogged gutters and neglected pools.

Carried by mosquitoes, the West Nile Virus can cause deadly inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) or inflammation of the membrane that surrounds the brain (meningitis) in humans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. saw 1,358 cases of West Nile Virus in humans in 2008, resulting in 44 deaths.

Taking a New Spin on “Oiling the Wheel”

<b>Taking a New Spin on “Oiling the Wheel”</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – When people talk about destructive technology, they mention nuclear bombs and bio-weaponry — they rarely cite the wheel. After all, the invention of the wheel enabled shipping, industrialization, transportation and iPods — all the trappings of modern civilization.

But once we started making rubber wheels, as in tires, we created a problem. Tires wear down and must be replaced. And getting rid of worn-out tires proves problematic. Every year, about 188 million scrap tires end up in landfills, stockpiles and illegal dumps.

Because of their empty middles, tires take up significant amounts of landfill space. They also tend to rise to the top of landfills, where they can provide homes for rodents and disturb landfill cover. Shredding tires helps, but the process is too expensive to be used universally.

And believe it or not, stockpiles of scrap tires can cost lives. Tires’ void spaces can collect rainfall, creating pools of standing water that facilitate mosquito breeding. Mosquitoes do more than annoy — they also spread deadly diseases, including Yellow Fever, Dengue and West Nile Virus. Shipping used tires between states has helped spread dangerous, non-native mosquito species through the country.

Tires can also become fire hazards. Although tires are slow to ignite, once tire fires start, they are hard to extinguish. Foam and water often prove useless. In 1998, a grass fire ignited 7 million tires in California’s San Joaquin Valley. Originally expected to burn two weeks, the fire lasted over two years. The fire created noxious gas and an oily residue, which affected local communities and water systems.

America needs to keep its tires from piling up. Some tires can be recycled and mixed with other materials to create walls and footing for playgrounds. Others may become fuel for the very cars they used to wheel.

One company, JBI Inc., has developed a process, Tires to Oil, that turns used tires into a fuel similar to biodiesel. The tires do not have to be shredded or separated, and can become oil in as little as two to four hours. A gas by-product created by the process supplies all of the energy needed to convert the tires into oil. Turning tires into fuel will ease America’s dependency on foreign oil, not to mention reduce the number of scrap tires currently threatening human health.

JBI Inc. trades on the OTC under the stock symbol JBII. For more information, visit www.jbiglobal.com.

Safeguard Yourself Against Mosquitoes, West Nile Virus

<b>Safeguard Yourself Against Mosquitoes, West Nile Virus</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Although national consumer confidence has risen in recent months, the recession is still significantly affecting homeowners. While foreclosure figures underscore the current economic conditions, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) reminds homeowners to remain vigilant of an ancillary issue stemming from continued increases in vacated homes — potential mosquito infestations, especially in or around foreclosed properties with clogged gutters and neglected pools.

Carried by mosquitoes, the West Nile Virus can cause deadly inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) or inflammation of the membrane that surrounds the brain (meningitis) in humans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. saw 1,358 cases of West Nile Virus in humans in 2008, resulting in 44 deaths.

Although no specific therapy or vaccine exist for the West Nile Virus, the NPMA recommends the following preventive measures:

– Avoid mosquito nesting and breeding sites. Try to eliminate standing water and other sources of moisture in or around the home in flowerpots, water dishes, birdbaths, swimming pool covers, barrels and other objects that can collect water.

– Keep windows and doors properly screened to keep mosquitoes outside.

– Be alert when outdoors during dawn, dusk and early evening hours, when mosquito-biting activity can peak. Also, avoid areas near water where mosquitoes gather, especially during peak activity.

– Avoid wearing bright colors, open-toe shoes and sweet-smelling perfumes or colognes.

– Plan ahead for spending time outdoors. Wear mosquito repellent with DEET as well as appropriate apparel such as long pants and long-sleeve shirts.

To learn more about mosquito-control options or to find a pest-control professional in your area, visit www.pestworld.org.

Web Sites Teach Public About Bugs, Germs, DEET

<b>Web Sites Teach Public About Bugs, Germs, DEET</b> (NewsUSA) – What are the 10 most dangerous pests? What are antimicrobials and how do they protect us? What do the most effective insect repellents contain?

Find answers to these questions and more on the Consumer Specialty Products Association’s public information Web sites, DeetOnline.org, AboutBugs.com and AboutGerms.com.

The sites provide in-depth information on disinfectants, pest repellents and other everyday products that help provide a cleaner, healthier living environment.

Read on to find out more about the Web sites and how they can help you.

* DeetOnline.org: From choosing and using repellents to protecting yourself from insect-borne diseases, DeetOnline.org provides eye-opening information on and benefits of using DEET-containing products. These products – along with cautionary measures such as wearing long-sleeved shirts and long pants and checking for ticks immediately after spending time outdoors – are your best bet for keeping insect- and tick-borne diseases, such as West Nile virus and Lyme disease, at bay.

Spotting repellents containing DEET is now easier thanks to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which approved adding the acronym to labels, clarifying its cumbersome scientific name. The site answers frequently asked questions and contains helpful links to information about this active ingredient.

* AboutBugs.com: Effective pest control starts with knowing more about the everyday insects that can threaten your health, including houseflies, cockroaches, lice, dust mites and spiders. For instance, did you know that ordinary houseflies have extraordinarily bad habits that can affect your health? Flies can pick up disease-causing germs, transferring them to food you eat by touching surfaces with their legs or mouths.

Aside from taking a critical look at these pests, the site also shows how pest management products help people, animals and crops. It also provides in-depth information on West Nile virus, Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

* AboutGerms.com: Most germs, or microbes, are so small, they can only be seen with a microscope. From the plates you use to the water you drink, germs are ever-present – and some are harmful.

AboutGerms.com offers a comprehensive look at germs and the antimicrobials that help protect your health and home. Antimicrobial products are used to clean and disinfect homes, hospitals, restaurants, hotels, schools and offices, and to purify drinking water.

For more information about CSPA, visit www.cspa.org.