DeVry University Seniors Learn There’s Value in Pro Bono Work

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – In a social media powered society, instant gratification is something we have come to expect. More of our daily routines are executed online, be they personal or professional, so when our computer crashes so does our productivity.
In the not-so-distant past, PC problems, virus removal and most other computer-related issues were resolved by carting your PC or laptop into a service center. This is not an easy burden to bear when time is of the essence. With immediate response in high demand, computer support companies have moved their services online, offering comprehensive tech support without the hassle of waiting at in-store service lines.
With the ability to get news, updates and results online in real-time, shouldn’t you be able to access computer troubleshooting online when an issue arises?
In an effort to harness the potential of remote access, some standout IT businesses are implementing remote services to create a better user experience for their clients. Geeks On Call, a trusted provider of on-site IT services nationwide, recently announced the launch of their Remote PC Repair Services.
If a person’s computer suddenly crashes, slows down or gets a virus, Geeks On Call is there with comprehensive technical support to see the issues through to solution. Because the troubled computer is remotely accessed through the Internet, there is no need to wait for a technician to make a house call. However, if there is no Internet access to the computer, Geeks on Call still has an on-site assistance option — in many cases, it can get a technician to you the same day you call. And unlike other services, it can dispatch a technician directly to your location with the ability to refund the majority of the service call.
By taking advantage of remote computer repair with services like those offered by Geeks On Call, users will see real-time solutions for serious computing problems. Remote Services are available 8 a.m. to midnight in the customer’s time zone at 1-800-905-GEEK (4335). For more information, visit www.geeksoncall.com.

Tips to Protect Yourself Against Mosquitos and West Nile Disease

Although national consumer confidence has risen in recent months, the recession is still significantly affecting homeowners. While foreclosure figures underscore the current economic conditions, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) reminds homeowners that vacated homes are prone to mosquito infestations, especially in or around foreclosed properties with clogged gutters and neglected pools.

Carried by mosquitoes, the West Nile Virus can cause deadly inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) or inflammation of the membrane that surrounds the brain (meningitis) in humans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. saw 1,358 cases of West Nile Virus in humans in 2008, resulting in 44 deaths.

Safeguard Yourself Against Mosquitoes, West Nile Virus

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Although national consumer confidence has risen in recent months, the recession is still significantly affecting homeowners. While foreclosure figures underscore the current economic conditions, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) reminds homeowners to remain vigilant of an ancillary issue stemming from continued increases in vacated homes — potential mosquito infestations, especially in or around foreclosed properties with clogged gutters and neglected pools.

Carried by mosquitoes, the West Nile Virus can cause deadly inflammation of the brain (encephalitis) or inflammation of the membrane that surrounds the brain (meningitis) in humans. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. saw 1,358 cases of West Nile Virus in humans in 2008, resulting in 44 deaths.

Although no specific therapy or vaccine exist for the West Nile Virus, the NPMA recommends the following preventive measures:

– Avoid mosquito nesting and breeding sites. Try to eliminate standing water and other sources of moisture in or around the home in flowerpots, water dishes, birdbaths, swimming pool covers, barrels and other objects that can collect water.

– Keep windows and doors properly screened to keep mosquitoes outside.

– Be alert when outdoors during dawn, dusk and early evening hours, when mosquito-biting activity can peak. Also, avoid areas near water where mosquitoes gather, especially during peak activity.

– Avoid wearing bright colors, open-toe shoes and sweet-smelling perfumes or colognes.

– Plan ahead for spending time outdoors. Wear mosquito repellent with DEET as well as appropriate apparel such as long pants and long-sleeve shirts.

To learn more about mosquito-control options or to find a pest-control professional in your area, visit www.pestworld.org.

The Earlier, the Better: Building Immune Defenses Against H1N1

<b>The Earlier, the Better: Building Immune Defenses Against H1N1</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Recently, scientists discovered that the 2009 H1N1 Swine Flu virus is more like the H5N1 avian flu than the historic 1918 pandemic H1N1 Spanish flu strain, and that current mutations of the virus have rendered previous flu vaccines less effective.

In a teleconference with colleagues, Dr. Roger Mazlen, an internist in Rosyln Heights, NY, discussed the current Swine Flu outbreaks. Aside from traditional medical school, Dr. Mazlen received specialized training at the National Institute for Health (NIH) and is the former Clinical Research Director for Immunotec, Ltd. in Canada. He has practiced internal medicine and nutrition for more than 30 years.

Swine flu, or H1N1, was first isolated in a pig in 1930, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The virus has demonstrated an ability to migrate from domestic pigs to humans. Dr. Mazlen said there are several factors contributing to the current swine flu outbreak, including environmental, cultural and economic issues. “The current recession, loss of retirement funds, compromised nutrition, reduced exercise, obesity and other factors produce immune depression. A depressed immune system cannot fight off the invasion of viral and other pathogens that attempt to find a home to set up infections in our bodies,” he says.

Dr. Mazlen suggests protection strategies for a potentially larger H1N1 outbreak during the 2009 through 2010 flu season. “Frequent hand washing is a start. Also, lots of daily water helps to hydrate the body and assist the immune system,” he said. Vitamin and mineral supplements add fortification, but Dr. Mazlen suggested also adding fish oil because of its clinically-proven immune function support. Fish oil blends are available as gel capsules or in liquid form at health food stores, and several different brands are also available at www.puritan.com.

Dr. Mazlen said that Tamiflu, the currently recommended prescription medication used in flu and Swine flu, is most effective when used within a few hours of the first viral symptoms. But Swine Flu, as reported by the CDC, has an ability to mutate within hours. Tamiflu may be effective for Swine Flu in the morning, and may be ineffective by the end of the day because of viral mutation.

When asked whether the popular herbal remedy Echinacea could be effective, Dr. Mazlen explained that studies have proven the product has minimal effectiveness in stimulating the immune response. He said he prefers a natural immune-stimulating product that he has used with over 500 patients, including his family members. The product was originally developed in Russia but is now made in the U.S. Dr. Mazlen said he has had good results during the past years with patients fighting flu and other infections. The product, Del-Immune V, is available at www.delimmune.com.

Early measures to protect health might be the key to minimizing potentially serious infections this flu season. Dr. Mazlen closed the discussion by expressing his concern over whether it is Swine Flu H1N1 or a mutated form of the Swine Flu. “It is important to have an immune defense strategy this year — the earlier the better,” he said.

After-Shingles Pain: Significant Impact on Elderly

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – JoAnn Jones (name changed to protect patient privacy) first noticed the pain in her upper right shoulder and back. She initially went to her chiropractor, thinking it was related to lower back pain, but as the pain grew over the next five days, she knew it was something more serious. When she awoke the fifth morning with a rash covering parts of her body, her doctor immediately put her on an antiviral medication for shingles. The rash eventually faded, but the pain did not.

“It’s a devastating illness, a chronic condition that you live with 24-7,” explains Jones about her postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), or after-shingles pain.

Ms. Jones is not alone in her struggle. Every year, approximately 1 million Americans develop shingles, or herpes zoster. Distinguishable by a rash and blisters that most commonly occur on the torso — chest and back — waistline, upper arms or side of the face, shingles is caused by the same virus that causes chicken pox, the varicella-zoster virus.

One-in-five people diagnosed with shingles suffer complications resulting in PHN, or after-shingles pain resulting from nerve damage caused by the virus. PHN pain, which may last for months or sometimes even years, can be devastating to those it affects.

“PHN pain can erode a person’s quality of life, especially for elderly patients,” says Dr. Christopher Gharibo, director of Pain Medicine and assistant professor of Anesthesiology at NYU School of Medicine, “The pain can make everyday activities, like bathing or dressing, excruciating. Chronic pain often leads to serious depression. In fact, PHN is the most common cause of pain-related suicide in the elderly.”

PHN disproportionately affects the 50-and-over population and people with weakened immune systems. In fact, shingles patients age 50 or older have a more than 50 percent chance of developing PHN, and patients age 80 or older have an 80 percent chance of developing the condition.

Ms. Jones urges, “If you are over 50 and have unexplained pain, ask your doctor if it might be from shingles.” Early treatment for shingles could lessen or prevent the duration of shingles and lower the risk for PHN.

If you think you or someone you know might be suffering from shingles or PHN, talk to your doctor immediately. You can learn more about shingles and PHN by visiting www.AfterShingles.com.

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