Treating Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: How One Woman Achieved Remission

<b>Treating Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: How One Woman Achieved Remission</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – This year, nearly 66,000 Americans will be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) — a cancer of the lymphatic system — and between 30 and 40 percent of these patients will have indolent NHL, a slowly developing form that is difficult to treat because patients are prone to relapse after therapy.

Thankfully, there have been a number of advances in treating NHL. Recently, a study published in the journal Cancer showed that a chemotherapy called TREANDA (bendamustine HCl) for Injection produced durable responses in patients with indolent B-cell NHL whose disease had progressed within six months of treatment with a therapy called rituximab as a component.

This is good news for patients like 65-year-old Arlington, Texas, resident Eunice Kendall. In March 2008, Eunice began feeling pain in her back, and attributed it to arthritis. When the pain did not subside, she was referred to Dr. Sohail Akbani, a medical oncologist at the Arlington Cancer Center. Results from a CAT scan revealed that Eunice had indolent B-cell NHL.

Dr. Akbani began aggressive treatment for Eunice, including six cycles of a chemotherapy regimen called CHOP, a chemotherapy treatment, plus rituximab, a monoclonal antibody. Following her remission in July 2008, Dr. Akbani began Eunice on a rituximab maintenance therapy.

Despite maintenance therapy, Eunice’s disease progressed. Dr. Akbani discovered this in August 2009 and began a bendamustine-based therapy after discussing treatment options with Eunice.

“When a patient is not responding to a certain therapy, we work to identify a treatment that may be the right choice,” said Dr. Akbani. “Although Eunice was hesitant to receive chemotherapy again, I believed a bendamustine-based therapy would be an effective and tolerable option for her.”

After receiving treatment with the bendamustine-based therapy, Eunice achieved remission. Individual results may vary.

Eunice has maintained her sense of humor and positive outlook on life and is very thankful for her health. Her days are now spent with her granddaughters, working in her garden, cheering on the Dallas Cowboys, and visiting family and friends.

“I’m only 65 years old,” she says. “I’ve got a lot of living left to do.”

Convenience Takes the Guesswork Out of Antibiotic Compliance

<b>Convenience Takes the Guesswork Out of Antibiotic Compliance</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Antibiotics don’t work if you don’t take them correctly, yet patients consistently skip dosages, take too many dosages at once or end treatments early — what’s going on?

In many cases, patients’ lives interfere with their ability to stick to treatment regimes. Skipping a pill is the most common mistake patients make — but those who work through their illness might not get the opportunity to take a mid-day dose. This can lead some patients to take a double dose earlier in the day, which can also cause problems.

Other patients’ schedules prevent them from taking pills at regular intervals. For example, someone might have three hours between their morning and mid-day pills, but not take their evening dosage for another 10 hours.

Patients need to take antibiotics correctly — and that means finding ways to fit antibiotics into busy schedules.

Convenience makes a difference — the more pills that need to be taken per day, the less patients stick to their treatments. A 2001 peer review of 76 studies by researchers A. Claxton, J. Cramer and C. Pierce found that, on average, 79 percent of patients complied with once-daily regimes, while only 65 percent took thrice-daily prescriptions correctly.

To make antibiotics more convenient, researchers are developing more once-daily antibiotics. For example, in January 2008,

the FDA approved Moxatag (www.moxatag.com), a once-daily antibiotic for the treatment of strep throat. The Moxatag tablet slowly releases amoxicillin (a drug in the penicillin family) as it goes through the digestive system, and its convenient, once-daily dosing can potentially lead to improved patient compliance.

Patients can also develop strategies to help them remember pills. For example, associating dosages with a daily activity, like brushing teeth, helps patients remember to take their pills. Even putting stickers or Post-Its on often-used items can improve compliance.

For more information, visit www.moxatag.com.

Important Safety Information:

MOXATAG is contraindicated in patients with known serious hypersensitivity to amoxicillin or to other drugs in the same class or patients who have demonstrated anaphylactic reactions to beta lactams. Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactic) reactions have been reported in patients on penicillin therapy. If an allergic reaction occurs, MOXATAG should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. Clostridium difficile Associated Diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents, including amoxicillin, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, MOXATAG should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. The possibility of superinfections with mycotic or bacterial pathogens should be kept in mind during therapy. If superinfections occur, MOXATAG should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. The most common drug-related adverse reactions associated with MOXATAG observed in clinical studies are vulvovaginal mycotic infection (2.0%), diarrhea (1.7%), nausea (1.3%), vomiting (0.7%) and headache (1.0%). See www.moxatag.com for additional safety information on the safety of Moxatag. Moxatag is approved for the treatment of strep throat in patients 12 and older. Moxatag is a registered trademark of MiddleBrook Pharmaceuticals, Inc. This article is sponsored by MiddleBrook Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Antibiotic Compliance: A Bitter Pill to Swallow

<b>Antibiotic Compliance: A Bitter Pill to Swallow</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – If you stop taking antibiotics as soon as symptoms end, the drugs potentially won’t have the opportunity to kill every bacterium. Soon, you’ll develop another infection — only this time, you’ll need stronger antibiotics to stop it.

Patient noncompliance — that is, taking medications incorrectly — is the number-one reason that antibiotics fail. Worse, misusing antibiotics helps create bacteria that resist treatment.

Even patients with good intentions can become noncompliant. In a 2009 study from Spain’s University Rovira i Virgili, only 55.1 percent of the patients taking antibiotics thrice daily finished at least 80 percent of their medication, mostly because they forgot their afternoon dose. In the study, patients taking antibiotics once a day showed a higher compliance rate at 86.7 percent.

To help yourself out, ask your doctor about once-a-day dosages. For example, while most strep treatments call for twice-daily or thrice-daily antibiotics, the FDA has approved a once-daily antibiotic for the treatment of strep throat called Moxatag. Moxatag employs a “pulse” delivery system — the tablet slowly releases amoxicillin, a drug in the penicillin family, as it travels through the digestive system. This technology allows the antibiotic to effectively kill strep throat bacteria with once-daily dosing whereas, other penicillin family regimens require multiple doses per day.

You can also avoid antibiotic resistance by making sure that you need antibiotics. Strep throat can only be diagnosed through a test -; if the test comes back negative, you don’t need antibiotics. Also, you shouldn’t ask your doctor for newer or stronger drugs. Penicillin-class antibiotics, like amoxicillin, are the best first line of treatment for strep throat — and there are no known cases of resistance to these antibiotics. Strep has been known, however, to resist stronger classes of antibiotics.

For more information, visit www.moxatag.com.

Important Safety Information

MOXATAG is contraindicated in patients with known serious hypersensitivity to amoxicillin or to other drugs in the same class or patients who have demonstrated anaphylactic reactions to betalactams. Serious and occasionally fatal hypersensitivity (anaphylactic) reactions have been reported in patients on penicillin therapy. If an allergic reaction occurs, MOXATAG should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. Clostridium Difficile Associated Diarrhea (CDAD) has been reported with nearly all antibacterial agents, including amoxicillin, and may range in severity from mild diarrhea to fatal colitis. If CDAD is suspected or confirmed, MOXATAG should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. The possibility of superinfections with mycotic or bacterial pathogens should be kept in mind during therapy. If superinfections occur, MOXATAG should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted. The most common drug-related adverse reactions associated with MOXATAG observed in clinical studies are vulvovaginal mycotic infection (2.0%), diarrhea (1.7%), nausea (1.3%), vomiting (0.7%) and headache (1.0%).

MOXATAG is approved for patients ages 12 and over. MOXATAG is a registered trademark of MiddleBrook Pharmaceuticals, Inc. See www.moxatag.com for additional safety information on the safety of Moxatag. This article is sponsored by MiddleBrook Pharmaceuticals, Inc.

Need a Helping Hand? Massage Benefits Reach Beyond Relaxation

<b>Need a Helping Hand? Massage Benefits Reach Beyond Relaxation</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – How often do you come home from work saying, “I need a massage”? Chances are, it is quite often — and the reason is probably due to stress. But did you know that the touch of a massage professional can do more than relieve the stresses of your day?

Timeless and universal, massage therapy offers numerous health and therapeutic benefits that are proven to help relieve pain from conditions such as arthritis, migraines, back pain and even fibromyalgia.

“Indeed, given today’s stressful environment, more Americans are turning to therapeutic massage treatment for good health maintenance and relief from the aches, pains and stress of everyday life,” says CG Funk, vice president of industry relations and product development at Massage Envy. “Many people use massage as part of their wellness plan with much success.”

Massage therapy helps you relax, re-align and rejuvenate. There are many positive aspects to receiving massage therapy on an ongoing basis, and with the busy lives we lead, we all can benefit from a little stress management.

Massage Envy, the nation’s largest massage therapy provider, offers these eye-opening facts about this age-old wellness treatment:

* A study conducted by the Touch Research Institute at the University of Miami School of Medicine showed that ongoing massage could lower anxiety, reduce pain, and improve grip strength for those who suffer from arthritis.

* Research indicates that massage therapy can boost immunity and reduce hypertension.

* Any kind of touch stimulates the release of endorphins (the body’s natural pain killers), can reduce heart rate and lower blood pressure. Imagine how good you would feel after a one-hour massage.

* A recent study cited by the American Massage Therapy Association showed that in adults with migraine headaches massage therapy decreased the occurrence of headaches, sleep disturbances and distress symptoms. It also increased serotonin levels, believed to play an important role in the regulation of mood, sleep and appetite.

* National Center for Health Statistics found adults age 45-64 years were the most likely to report pain lasting more than 24 hours. Research indicates that massage therapy can reduce chronic pain and stress in people with lower back and neck problems and stiff joints.

For more information, visit www.MassageEnvy.com.

Burn Victim Turns to Laser Therapy for Speedy Recovery

<b>Burn Victim Turns to Laser Therapy for Speedy Recovery</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Kip Lytle didn’t check the water’s temperature before stepping into his hot tub. Unaware that the hot tub thermostat had malfunctioned and the water temperature was 140 degrees, Lytle received painful second-degree burns on his calf.

Doctors told Lytle the burns would take months to heal. But Lytle decided to try an unconventional treatment. His father, Dr. Larry Lytle, was in the process of developing a low-level laser therapy product called the QLaser, which the FDA recently approved for the treatment of osteoarthritis in the hands. Having seen the healing benefits that low-level laser therapy could provide, Kip decided to try it on his burn.

“I had the low-level laser treating the burns within 30 seconds,” says Kip. “I used the laser for an hour twice a day.”

The result? A severe wound that healed, not in months as the doctors had predicted, but in only days. Lytle was able to wear pants again within a week. The burn was almost completely healed at nine days. And at four weeks, there was no scarring, and there was little evidence that an injury had occurred at all.

The QLaser hasn’t undergone double-blind studies to prove that it works on burns, and the company makes no treatment claims in this regard. But, says Lytle, “there’s no doubt in my mind that it speeded my recovery and healing from this injury.”

Many medical professionals agree with Lytle’s assessment. Low-level laser therapy has been used to help speed healing since the late 1960s. The lasers work by directing concentrated light at bodily cells — the light seems to increase cell energy and circulation, and helps heal damaged cell membranes. Low-level laser treatments might also help cells absorb nutrients more effectively. Patients typically report experiencing reduced inflammation, less pain and faster healing. The lasers cannot harm healthy cells. In fact, Class I low-level lasers like the Q1000 are so gentle that they do not harm eyes.

Low-level laser therapy is non-invasive, has no known side effects and works with the body’s immune system to promote healing.

For more information and to download a copy of the free book “Universal Healer,” visit www.qlasersolutions.com and enter the promotional code 5275 in the dropdown menu. To receive an information packet, call 1-800-597-9231 and use promotional code 5275.

New Treatments Help Cancer Patients

<b>New Treatments Help Cancer Patients</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Men facing a diagnosis of prostate cancer have more treatment options than ever before, according to the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in American men. The American Cancer Society reports that, in 2008, one-quarter of all cancer diagnosed in men was prostate cancer.

But dramatic advances in treatments are allowing more men to beat the disease. Nearly 99 percent of men with prostate cancer now live five years or more after diagnosis.

Since there are several options, it’s important to discuss all the treatment methods with a radiation oncologist, a physician who specializes in treating diseases with radiation therapy, and a urologist, a surgeon who specializes in the urinary tract. They’ll help you decide which treatment plan is best for you. Possibilities include surgery, external beam radiation therapy, hormone therapy, chemotherapy or prostate brachytherapy.

Sometimes, a combination of treatments proves to be the best way to fight prostate cancer. For instance, some men choose surgery followed by external beam radiation therapy, also known as radiotherapy.

External beam radiation therapy involves a series of daily treatments that accurately deliver radiation to the prostate. This method often succeeds in treating cancer. Types of external beam radiation therapy include three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and proton beam therapy.

Brachytherapy involves treating the cancer by inserting radioactive sources into the gland itself. Seed implants are given by inserting small metal seeds of radioactive iodine or palladium directly into the prostate while the patient is under anesthesia.

In discussing treatment plans with your cancer specialists, be sure to keep your lifestyle in mind. Remember, every man’s cancer and lifestyle are unique. Discussions with several specialists can help you decide on the most effective and suitable treatment for your lifestyle and condition.

The American Society for Radiation Oncology has a brochure to help men and their families better understand their treatment options. Visit www.rtanswers.org or call 1-800-962-7876 for a free copy.

As Americans Age, COPD Rates Increase

<b>As Americans Age, COPD Rates Increase</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, otherwise known as COPD, is now the third leading cause of death globally -; one out of every four men and one of every six women who live to be 95 years old will develop COPD.

COPD describes many conditions that obstruct airflow in and out of the lungs. Research shows that patients with COPD are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hypertension. In fact, according to findings reported in the October 2008 issue of the European Respiratory Journal, more than half of the patients who have COPD will also develop cardiovascular disease, diabetes or hypertension.

In the U.S., doctors have diagnosed COPD in more than 32 million patients. Most of those patients require oxygen therapy. But oxygen therapy machines can be difficult for patients to operate. Some companies are developing devices to make oxygen therapy easier and more effective. For example, medical device manufacturer Ingen has developed the Oxyview, a gauge that tells patients when their equipment malfunctions.

Dr. Rozenbaum, a leading scientist and the Board Member of several recognized national COPD organizations and founder of COPD Alert, calls the device a “great idea.” “This very small and simple-to-operate, yet very accurate gauging device provides a high measure of security to patients, who can quickly be alerted to malfunctioning equipment and take the necessary steps to correct the situation or immediately contact their oxygen provider.” Oxyview is sold with a life-time warranty and is the only device of its kind in the respiratory market today.

Adds Dr. Rozenbaum, “I know of many patients who consider Oxyview a very important part of their oxygen therapy.”

As medical technologies advance and extend the average lifespan, more patients will develop COPD. According to an analysis from the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans born in 2004 will reach an average lifespan of 77.9 years, with women living longer than men. Currently, COPD is the fifth leading cause of death in the U.S.

For more information, visit www.ingen-tech.com.

Proton Therapy: A Success Story Made Known on the Today Show

<b>Proton Therapy: A Success Story Made Known on the Today Show</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Proton therapy, a radiation therapy that is growing in popularity among cancer patients, promises astounding results. Thanks to NBC correspondent George Lewis’ “prostate diary” report on The Today Show, Americans now know more about the advantages of proton therapy.

“I went on a radiation vacation,” stated NBC’s Lewis.” If you’re a guy worried about your male components, limiting collateral damage is an important consideration and a major selling point for the advocates of proton therapy.”

Dr. Jerry Slater, head of radiation medicine at Loma Linda University in Southern California, is fond of putting it this way: “Unlike conventional radiation, proton radiation has a well-defined high dose area which can be manipulated to precisely surround an irregularly shaped target.” The result? Protons destroy cancerous cells without damaging healthy cells.

Prostate cancer patients like Lewis, who did his homework, decided proton treatment at Loma Linda was his best option to avoid the side effects he was concerned about.

Another good example is children with cancer, who frequently experience devastating side effects from conventional radiation, such as growth inhabitation, can develop normally after receiving proton therapy treatment. It’s no wonder the nation’s five proton centers cannot keep up with patient demand. As Lewis reported, some patients with limited health care coverage, or patients from abroad, have been willing to personally supplement reimbursement to gain the advantages of proton therapy.

Medicare and most private health insurers cover the costs of proton therapy procedures. A vast majority of cancer patients agree on one thing -; technologies that promote faster healing with fewer side effects prove priceless.

From a physician’s perspective, the aim is to “do no harm” -; however, radiation therapists know that traditional radiation can destroy healthy cells and tissue. In most cases, radiation oncologists cannot deliver enough radiation to destroy tumors without compromising patient health.

In contrast, proton therapy can help patients not only survive cancer, but offer hope for a cure in addition to returning to a normal life afterwards. Lewis said he sailed through nine weeks of proton therapy. “Today, I feel great, and my 40 inch waistline is shrinking as I work on eating less and exercising more.”

For more information, call 800-protons (776-8667) or visit www.proton-therapy.org or www.protons.com.

New Treatments Help Men Fight Prostate Cancer

<b>New Treatments Help Men Fight Prostate Cancer</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer among American men. In fact, according to the American Cancer Society, as many as 1.8 million American men have the disease at any given time.

Although treatments for prostate cancer have existed for years, men can now choose from a wider variety of therapies than ever before. One in six men will develop prostate cancer at some point in his lifetime, but only one in 34 will die of the disease, and this statistic is improving with each passing year.

After being diagnosed with prostate cancer, patients will often discuss treatment methods with a radiation oncologist, a cancer doctor who specializes in treating diseases with radiation therapy, and a urologist, a surgeon who specializes in the urinary tract. Possible options for dealing with prostate cancer include surgery, external beam radiation therapy, hormone therapy, chemotherapy or prostate brachytherapy.

Sometimes, a combination of treatments proves to be the best way to fight prostate cancer; for example, some men undergo surgery followed by external beam radiation therapy, also known as radiotherapy. External beam radiation therapy, which involves a series of daily treatments to accurately deliver radiation to the prostate, often proves to be successful in treating cancer.

Brachytherapy involves treating the cancer by inserting radioactive sources into the gland itself. Seed implants are given by inserting small metal seeds of radioactive iodine or palladium directly into the prostate while the patient is under anesthesia.

To better understand your options, it’s important to speak with several cancer specialists before undergoing any kind of therapy, as each man’s cancer and health parameters are unique. Doing so can help you choose the most effective and suitable treatment for your life and condition. Organizations such as the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology can help you learn about your treatment options and establish contact with specialists suited to your condition.

Visit www.rtanswers.org for more information.

More U.S. Hospitals Offering Proton Beam Therapy

<b>More U.S. Hospitals Offering Proton Beam Therapy</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Proton beam therapy is increasingly being used to treat various cancers – so much that new centers are being planned for Hampton University in Virginia and the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center in Philadelphia.

The new sites are expected to cost between $190 and $250 million and open over the next three years. Dr. James Slater of Loma Linda University Medical Center in Southern California, a pioneer of clinical proton therapy, foresees upwards of 100 proton centers in the U.S. in the coming decades.

Proton beam therapy is a type of radiation that can precisely target tumors while sparing surrounding tissue and causing fewer side effects than traditional radiation. Proton beams deliver a low dose of therapy as it enters the body and releases virtually all of its energy at the targeted tumor site.

Currently there are three other proton beam therapy centers operating in the U.S. They are located at Loma Linda University Medical Center, Indiana University in Bloomington and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. They collectively have the capacity to treat 5,000 patients annually.

The center at Loma Linda, which opened in 1990, is the world’s first hospital-based proton treatment facility.

Initially, many radiologists and oncologists questioned the therapy’s cost and effectiveness. However, by the late 1990s, many had begun to recognize its benefits as studies showed excellent outcomes and significantly reduced side effects.

And that’s when Massachusetts General Hospital, the teaching hospital for Harvard’s medical school, built the second U.S. hospital-based proton treatment facility. Indiana University’s Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute opened for clinical care next.

“Oncologists have long known that substituting proton radiation for X-rays now used to treat about half of all cancer patients would do less harm to normal tissues and organs and more damage to malignant growths,” said Dr. James Cox, chairman of

radiation oncology and medical director of the proton cancer center at M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, which is set to open in spring 2006.

Seven proton centers are either under construction or being planned nationwide, said Leonard Arzt, executive director of the National Association for Proton Therapy. By the summer of 2006, the University of Florida’s Proton Therapy Institute will begin treating patients on the Shands Medical Center campus in Jacksonville.

Loma Linda has performed more than 250,000 proton treatments on more than 10,000 patients for various types of cancers, including prostate, head and neck tumors, eye tumors, certain lung cancers and abdominal cancers.

“At first, we treated three or four types of tumors, now we treat 50 types,” said Dr. Jerry Slater, chairman of radiation medicine at Loma Linda, which plans a new scanning technology to treat breast and more complicated lung cancers.

For more information, visit www.proton-therapy.org or call (800) PROTONS.