Are Your Kids Savvy About Internet Safety?

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – The Internet is an important educational tool. With a click of a mouse, kids can find information on just about anything. Unfortunately, children who don’t practice basic Internet safety may expose themselves and their parents to certain risks.
Children can easily stumble upon inappropriate content. Chat rooms have a reputation for encouraging Internet predation, but pedophiles can stalk victims from Web sites like Facebook as well. Many kids don’t realize that anyone can read what they write on the Internet, so they post home phone numbers, addresses, their full names or the names of their schools.
Social networking sites may also expose children to bullying, as peers can send demeaning e-mails, instant messaging and text messages without attracting attention from parents or teachers. Finally, children may download pirated music or movies, or even computer viruses or spyware.
“The Internet is an important resource for kids, if they know how to use it,” says John Goslin, chief technology officer of Boys & Girls Clubs of America (BGCA), a non-profit organization that strives to help young people realize their potential. “Parents need to be aware of the potential dangers and create guidelines to help kids avoid them.”
CA Technologies, which serves as the BGCA’s national information technology security partner through its global philanthropy program, CA Together IT, helps keep 56,000 BGCA computers secure. It starts off with security software, including anti-virus, anti-spam and anti-spyware technology, and prevention measures that restrict unauthorized use.
“Software can help prevent viruses, spyware and inappropriate spam messages, and allow parents to monitor and help protect their children online,” says George Kafkarkou, general manager of CA Technologies. “But parental supervision is the best security measure available to kids.”
Parents should know where their children go online and with whom they communicate. Placing computers in a family room can help you keep an eye on their activities. Parents should instruct children not to give out personal information online, even on sites like Facebook, and ask children to come to them if they encounter anything that makes them nervous or uncomfortable.
For more information, visit www.bgca.org.

Is Your Boss Spying on Your Internet Use?

Many assume that those Americans who are tweeting, updating Facebook profiles and uploading YouTube videos are in their teens. But when it comes to social networking, it’s not teens, but their parents who are driving growth.
According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project’s 2008 tracking survey, the number of adults with online profiles more than quadrupled after 2005. In fact, more adults use social networking sites than teens.
But adults who indulge in chatting, tweeting and updating their Facebook status at work might find themselves without a job. While many employers allow workers to participate on social networking sites (especially to make business connections), others have formed strict policies against LinkedIn, Facebook, MySpace, Digg, Twitter and similar sites.
And don’t think that employees can simply tweet on the sly. Many businesses are now using employee-monitoring software products, such as Spector CNE Investigator (www.spectorcne.com), to quickly and easily determine who’s goofing off, leaking company information, surfing Web sites or making off-topic Google searches. The software records all instant messages, chat conversations, e-mails, Web sites visited, programs run, files downloaded, files copied to removable media, and keystrokes typed. In addition, Spector CNE Investigator takes screen snapshots, so employers can watch their employees’ online activities in the sequence that they were performed.
While outright bans may seem harsh, employees should do work while at work — few employers want to pay workers to play online games or update their Facebook status. And yet, according to a survey conducted by an IT research firm, Nucleus Research, 77 percent of the employees with Facebook accounts check them during business hours, with 87 percent having no work-related reason for doing so.
Some studies suggest that social networking may improve productivity, so long as visits remain brief and account for less than 20 percent of an employee’s worktime. But no one wants to lose their job because they can’t stay away from Twitter.
Employees with a social networking problem might want to set strict limits for themselves, like restricting Facebook time to 10 minutes a day. If employees are using it for more than an appropriate amount of time, employers will know it if they are monitoring social network usage with Spector CNE.

Social Networking: Not Just for Kids Anymore

<b>Social Networking: Not Just for Kids Anymore</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Many assume that those Americans who are tweeting, updating Facebook profiles and uploading YouTube videos are in their teens. But when it comes to social networking, it’s not teens, but their parents who are driving growth.

According to the Pew Internet & American Life Project’s 2008 tracking survey, the number of adults with online profiles more than quadrupled after 2005. In fact, more adults use social networking sites than teens.

But adults who indulge in chatting, tweeting and updating their Facebook status at work might find themselves without a job. While many employers allow workers to participate on social networking sites (especially to make business connections), others have formed strict policies against LinkedIn, Facebook, MySpace, Digg, Twitter and similar sites.

And don’t think that employees can simply tweet on the sly. Many businesses are now using employee-monitoring software products, such as Spector CNE Investigator (www.spectorcne.com), to quickly and easily determine who’s goofing off, leaking company information, surfing Web sites or making off-topic Google searches. The software records all instant messages, chat conversations, emails, Web sites visited, programs run, files downloaded, files copied to removable media, and keystrokes typed. In addition, Spector CNE Investigator takes screen snapshots, so employers can watch their employees’ online activities in the sequence that they were performed.

While outright bans may seem harsh, employees should do work while at work — few employers want to pay workers to play online games or update their Facebook status. And yet, according to a survey conducted by an IT research firm, Nucleus Research, 77 percent of the employees with Facebook accounts check them during business hours, with 87 percent having no work-related reason for doing so.

Some studies suggest that social networking may improve productivity, so long as visits remain brief and account for less than 20 percent of an employee’s worktime. But no one wants to lose their job because they can’t stay away from Twitter.

Employees with a social networking problem might want to set strict limits for themselves, like restricting Facebook time to 10 minutes a day. If employees are using it for more than an appropriate amount of time, employers will know it if they are monitoring social network usage with Spector CNE.

What to Do in a Health Crisis

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – What do you do when your world is knocked out of orbit by a life-changing diagnosis? Whether it is a worst-case diagnosis by your doctor or an accident that leaves you vulnerable and exposed, only questions seem to be the first on the scene.

To educate themselves, many people who have suffered a health crisis go online. Online medical dictionaries, encyclopedias and journals give much-needed information, and social networking sites like CarePages.com provide support.

“CarePages was created to help people going through a life-changing health event find and give support,” said Dr. Sharon Langshur, co-founder of CarePages.com. “It’s not only a way to update friends and family, but for patients to support each other. Our members rely on each other for information, as well as encouragement and advice.”

CarePages has seen more than 4 million members since it’s creation, and has been used by people to create personal CarePages Web sites, join discussions, participate in blogs and interact with others facing similar challenges.

It’s important that no one face a health challenge alone. In fact, according to a study in The Journal of the American College of Surgeons, the size of a person’s social network can affect how pain is experienced and the duration of the healing process, and a recent study by CarePages found that 99 percent of 900 survey participants noted that emotional support can have a positive effect on the healing process.

For more information, visit www.CarePages.com.

Dating-Advice Web Site Attracting the Masses

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Social networking sites, professional personal ad writers and dating coaches can all help you meet someone special. But people need to know what to do when they finally get that first date. A new Web site, DatingtoRelating.com, is doing just that.

With over 500,000 visitors a month, Dating to Relating is quickly becoming the standard in Internet dating advice. While other Web sites, such as David DeAngleo’s DoubleYourDating.com and Neil Strauss’s StyleLife.com and TheMysteryMethod.com have seen their traffic decline over the past year, Dating to Relating has only seen its traffic increase, according to Alexa.com Web traffic statistics.

“They [love gurus] only tell you how to meet and attract women,” writes the anonymous Mr. L Rx on the popular Web site. “They don’t tell you how to relate [to] and keep them.”

Of course, Mr. L Rx makes sure to advise men on both how to meet women, and how to create and maintain relationships in his new book, “Dating to Relating -; From A to Z,” which is available in both print and Kindle editions at Amazon.com.

For men with first-date jitters here are some tips from Mr. L. Rx and Dating to Relating.com.

– Try to be interested instead of interesting. Being interesting leads to a lot of rejection and platonic friendships. Girls will be friends with a guy who is really interesting. But they want to date a guy who is interested in them.

– Don’t put too much conversation attention on sex, sexual topics, sexual innuendos and her looks. Girls wouldn’t even be on the first date if they weren’t vaguely OK with the concept. What she really wants to know is: What else do you want? What else do you like about her? What else can you do for her? What else do you have in common with her? How else can you have fun together?

– If you want to get a second date you have to create both sexual attraction and non-sexual attraction on that first date. Sexual attraction is created by such things as posture and attitude and other non-verbal motions and communications. Non-sexual attraction is created by listening to what the girl has to say, being truthful about who you are and finding and creating mutual interests that you can pursue together in the future.

For additional information about how to meet, date and relate to women, try visiting www.DatingtoRelating.com.

Teaching Kids Safe and Ethical Downloading

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Recent piracy lawsuits brought by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) have parents and youths concerned about the risks and ethics of downloading copyrighted songs and videos. But piracy charges are just one of many dangers kids face when they download files illegally.

Downloading files or software can make computers vulnerable to harmful programs, like viruses and spyware. File sharing can allow other Internet users access to all of the files on your computer, which means that information, like bank details and personal documents, can be stolen. Peer-to-peer, or P2P, sites are notorious for lacing any downloadable files with sexually graphic or violent content.

To help parents protect their families and computers, a non-profit organization, iKeepSafe.org, has developed resources to teach kids the safe and ethical use of the Internet and how to download safely. Before downloading, kids should understand the “3 KEEPs” for safe and honest downloading:

1. Keep safe your personal files. Don’t share your music, videos, games, or pictures -; especially pictures of yourself -; with strangers online.

2. Keep away from doubtful downloads. Files from peer-to-peer sites, social networking sites, or blogs of people you don’t know could have bad files attached to them.

3. Keep using common sense. If it’s not free in stores, it shouldn’t be free online -; that’s stealing from the creators, and it’s against the law.

A new children’s book and animated DVD, “Faux Paw and the Dangerous Download,” teach kids in a fun, non-threatening way the safe and ethical use of downloading. To further promote safety, parents can explain that file-sharing and illegal downloading of copyrighted materials is viewed as theft and can expose both you and them to legal action.

Parents should also check their computer’s browser history regularly -; evidence of P2P sites such as BitTorrent, Limewire, Joost, ANts, Gnutella, eDonkey or new icons and software on your desktop suggest illegal activity. Parents can also find suitable download sites for kids that are legal and free.

To preview the Faux Paw films and parent tutorials, and to find more information on critical Internet safety topics, visit www.iKeepSafe.org.