Tips to Cope with Migraines at Work

Many migraine sufferers “suck it up” and go to work even when they’re in pain. But doing so might cost more productivity than taking sick leave.

In one study conducted by the University of Tennessee Medical School and drug manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline, researchers surveyed 509 migraine sufferers. They found that patients “worked through” migraines 62 percent of the time, but that the pain reduced productivity by 25 percent. In fact, the researchers estimated that migraine patients lost a total of 974 hours when they stayed at home and 1,301 hours when they attended work.

Migraines Decrease Productivity, Even When You Go to Work

<b>Migraines Decrease Productivity, Even When You Go to Work</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Many migraine sufferers “suck it up” and go to work even when they’re in pain. But doing so might cost more productivity than taking sick leave.

In one study conducted by the University of Tennessee Medical School and drug manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline, researchers surveyed 509 migraine sufferers. They found that patients “worked through” migraines 62 percent of the time, but that the pain reduced productivity by 25 percent. In fact, the researchers estimated that migraine patients lost a total of 974 hours when they stayed at home and 1,301 hours when they attended work.

Those who don’t experience migraines may not understand how disabling the brain disorder, which causes throbbing headaches accompanied by nausea, dizziness, numbness, weakness, light and sound sensitivity, and visual symptoms, can become. About 18 percent of women and 6 percent of men suffer from migraines, and many either go undiagnosed or do not understand what treatment options are available. In many cases, patients can learn to manage their migraines, helping them get back to their lives — including their jobs.

LipGesic M, a non-prescription migraine headache medication, provides the following tips for migrainers:

* Talk to your doctor. Many medications currently used to treat migraines have side effects that restrict their use by some patients. If you’re worried about side effects, look for a natural remedy like LipGesic M (www.MyMigraineGone.com), which uses feverfew and ginger to reduce inflammation that causes the migraine attack.

* Understand your triggers. Start keeping a migraine journal to help you recognize patterns. Atmospheric pressure changes, strong smells, bright lights and certain foods, including processed meats, items containing caffeine, and alcoholic beverages have been known to cause migraines.

* Be honest with your workplace. Let your employer know that you have migraines — trying to hide them will only make it look like you have no reason for your absences. Make sure that they understand that your migraines are manageable. Try to reduce workplace triggers by asking coworkers to refrain from wearing strong perfume or by using a glare-proof screen on your computer. If your migraines are particularly frequent or severe, you might want to consider a job with flexible hours so that you can work around them.

Playing the Office Temperature Game to Save Money

<b>Playing the Office Temperature Game to Save Money</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Business owners should think twice before tweaking workplace temperature settings this winter. According to a new survey of office workers, sixty-nine percent said they would be willing to sacrifice their preferred temperature in the office to help their company conserve energy. However the survey also found that nearly four in five participants (78 percent) say they are less productive at work when they are too hot or too cold.

Johnson Controls (NYSE: JCI), the global leader in providing energy-efficiency solutions, commissioned a survey of nearly 800 American adults who work in an office setting regarding a variety of issues, including temperature, productivity and energy efficiency. The survey is part of the company’s Efficiency Now campaign to build nationwide awareness of the importance of energy efficiency at work and at home. The good news: The findings indicate that many workers think their employers could be doing more to be energy-efficient. The challenge: Business owners must avoid a negative impact on office productivity and the possibility that workers may take action to circumvent their discomfort, including the use of portable heaters or fans, if temperatures are not ideal.

“Employers may be tempted to turn down the thermostats this winter, but this quick fix could lead to hidden costs,” said Clay Nesler, vice president of Global Energy and Sustainability, Johnson Controls. “Energy-efficient systems and equipment is the win-win alternative, allowing businesses to save energy and money without sacrificing workplace productivity.”

Almost all participants said their office has been too hot or too cold at some point (98 percent), and when that occurs, most (78 percent) said they are less productive. Not only does workplace productivity suffer, individual actions — such as bringing a heating or cooling device into the office -; result in increased energy use.

* Forty-nine percent of office workers have used a fan when it was too hot in their office, and 28 percent have used a space heater when it was too cold.

* Nearly one-third (30 percent) have left their office building to take a walk outside when it was too hot or too cold in their work space.

For additional information, please visit www.johnsoncontrols.com/efficiencynow.