Want a “Fresh from the Dentist” Smile?

People love to experience that “fresh from the dentist” feeling, when the tip of the tongue glides effortlessly and smoothly over a freshly cleaned set of pearly whites. So, why not have that feeling all of the time?

If you want a healthy mouth, follow these tips:

•    Brush regularly. Yes, you’ve heard it over and over: brush your teeth twice every day. It also helps to brush after eating and snacking, whenever possible. Brushing keeps small food particles from becoming food for harmful bacteria. If possible, brush for a full two minutes.

Learn How to Keep Teeth with Braces Clean

Teenagers love things that are shiny and new – unless those things happen to be attached to their teeth. But with proper care and technique, your teen may eventually learn to love their newest physical trait.

Braces have become commonplace in many families – approximately 4 million people receive orthodontic care in the U.S. each year. Most people undergo orthodontic treatment during adolescent and teenage years, when the permanent teeth have come in and treatment can be most effective.

Yet, as many parents already know, getting teenagers to adhere to a cleaning routine can be tricky. For parents and teens who want to keep the cleanest teeth with braces, follow these tips:

Your Heart is in Your Mouth: Good Oral Hygiene Could Mean Healthier Hearts

For years, you may have overlooked a handy tool in the fight against cardiovascular disease: your toothbrush.

Studies link tooth and gum health to heart health. A 2005 review from Finland’s Helsinki University Central Hospital, which was published in the “Journal of Periodontology,” found that chronic inflammation, such as that found in gum disease, increases the risk that a patient will develop heart disease. A 2010 survey of 12,000 people in Scotland found that, over an average of eight years, those who rarely or never brushed their teeth were 70 percent more likely to develop heart disease than those with twice-daily brushing habits.

Tips to Keep Preschoolers’ Teeth Healthy

Preschoolers’ smiling teeth do more than just bring joy to the people who see them. Kids’ teeth also help them chew and speak, and they create space in the jaw for adult teeth to grow in straight. Unfortunately, these “baby teeth” are also prone to early childhood caries or baby bottle tooth decay, also known as cavities.

How do preschoolers develop cavities? As in adults, children’s mouths are filled with bacteria. Whenever a child consumes sugar or starch, the bacteria feed on the sugar, releasing acid as a byproduct. This acid can break down the outer layer of the tooth, creating cavities.

Help Your Kids Brush Up on Oral Care

You teach your kids to brush their teeth, yet every trip to the dentist reveals another cavity. But don’t fret. You’re not doing anything wrong — children can still develop dental cavities, or areas where harmful bacteria damage hard tooth structure, in spite of every precaution. In fact, tooth decay remains the most common chronic condition in children and adolescents.

Kids’ teeth are more likely than adults’ to get cavities. For one thing, children tend to like sugary foods, which make them more likely to develop cavities. But sugar does not cause cavities directly — sugar feeds the bad bacteria that cause tooth decay.

Tired of Doggy Breath? Prevention Is Key to Protect Pets From Oral Disease

Your pet is a beloved family member. You buy him comfy pillows and squeaky toys, premium kibble and trips to the groomer. But if you’re like most pet owners, you’re neglecting a major part of your cat or dog’s medical care – his mouth.

Oral disease, including periodontal or gum disease, is the most common disorder in cats and dogs. The internal research team of Banfield, The Pet Hospital, supports findings that 68 percent of cats and 78 percent of dogs over the age of three display signs of oral disease, including bad breath, pain while chewing, weight loss, yellow teeth, red or swollen gums, missing teeth, nasal discharge or tearing or swelling below one eye. In advanced cases, gum disease can lead to bone infections.

Tips to Keep Preschoolers’ Teeth Healthy

<b>Tips to Keep Preschoolers’ Teeth Healthy</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Preschoolers’ smiling teeth do more than just bring joy to the people who see them. Preschoolers’ teeth also help them chew and speak, and they create space in the jaw for adult teeth to grow in straight. Unfortunately, these “baby teeth” are also prone to early childhood caries or baby bottle tooth decay, also known as cavities.

How do preschoolers develop cavities? As in adults, children’s mouths are filled with bacteria. Whenever a child consumes sugar or starch, the bacteria feed on the sugar, releasing acid as a byproduct. This acid can break down the outer layer of the tooth, creating cavities.

So, how can parents ensure that preschoolers’ teeth stay healthy? Here are some tips:

* Keep preschoolers’ teeth clean. By the time a child has reached age 2 to 5, they should be on their way to caring for their own teeth. By age three, they should have a full set of baby teeth. Most children at this age will want to brush their teeth on their own, but it is important to supervise and help them until they are doing it correctly. Do a quick follow-up brushing if necessary with a soft-bristled tooth brush.

* Use probiotics. Oral care probiotics can be an effective step in a preschooler’s oral care routine. If left unchecked, bad

bacteria can overwhelm the mouth, possibly leading to tooth decay. EvoraKids (www.myevorakids.com), a chewable containing a special blend of oral care probiotics designed for children, works by flooding the mouth with good bacteria, which adhere to tooth surfaces, including crevices, pits and fissures in the chewing surfaces, helping to promote happy smiles. It supports tooth health by balancing the bacteria in the mouth.

* Limit sweets. Sugar produces an acid that removes calcium from teeth, thereby breaking down the enamel. Only give children fruit for snacks, not cookies or crackers with refined sugar. If you do keep sweets in your house, only give children candy that they can consume all at once. Always make them brush their teeth soon after eating candy to remove any sugars that may still be sitting in the mouth.

* Avoid sharing silverware with your child. Never put your mouth on anything that will enter your child’s mouth — children aren’t born with destructive bacteria in the mouth, they catch them from mom and dad.

Can’t Stop Smoking? Protect Your Smile

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – When people discuss the health effects of tobacco, they rarely mention tooth loss. Yet, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 41.3 percent of daily smokers over age 65 are toothless, compared to 20 percent of the nonsmoking population.

How does smoking put gaps in your smile? All forms of tobacco, including cigarettes, cigars and smokeless “chew,” can cause gum tissue to recede, leaving a greater percentage of each tooth exposed to the bacteria that cause gum disease. Smoking also interferes with healing by reducing blood flow, making it easier for infection to set in and harder to eradicate it.

Quitting tobacco is the best thing smokers can do to improve their health, but going cold-turkey is easier said than done. However, even smokers struggling to quit can take steps to promote healthy teeth and gums. Dr. Jeffrey Hillman, DMD, Ph.D., believes that taking oral probiotics, such as EvoraPlus probiotic mints (www.myevoraplus.com), can help smokers maintain their oral health.

“Oral probiotics attach themselves to the teeth and gum tissue, establishing colonies of live, active beneficial bacteria both on the surface of the teeth and deep beneath the gum line,” says Dr. Hillman. “These colonies compete for both nutrients and space with the harmful oral bacteria that challenge gum and tooth health, as well as cause bad breath.”

In addition to crowding out bad bacteria, the oral probiotics in EvoraPlus naturally release low levels of hydrogen peroxide, so EvoraPlus gently whitens teeth. This is more good news for smokers, as tobacco products create stains on teeth that cannot be removed through regular brushing. Taking oral probiotics won’t reduce tobacco users’ risk of oral cancer or lung disease. As advanced gum disease has been linked to systematic health problems, such as heart disease, which

is also exacerbated by smoking, smokers should take every step to keep their mouths healthy as they work to quit smoking.

Is Your Pet’s Bad Breath Dogging You?

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Your pet is a beloved family member. You buy him comfy pillows and squeaky toys, premium kibble and trips to the groomer. But if you’re like most pet owners, you’re neglecting a major part of pet medical care — their mouth.

Oral disease, which includes periodontal disease or gum disease, is the most common disorder in cats and dogs. The internal research team of Banfield, The Pet Hospital (www.banfield.net), supports findings that 68 percent of cats and 78 percent of dogs over the age of 3 display signs of oral disease, including bad breath, pain while chewing, weight loss, yellow teeth, red or swollen gums, missing teeth, nasal discharge or tearing or swelling below one eye. There are four stages of periodontal disease, starting with mild plaque and gingivitis and progressing to major gum recession and tooth loss.

Dogs and cats use their mouths like we use our hands, so dental disease can seriously affect their ability to eat and play. Worse, evidence suggests a link between gum disease and other serious health problems.

“Periodontal disease has also been associated with changes in a pets’ kidneys, liver and cardiac functions,” said Jeffrey Klausner, DVM, MS, DACVIM, senior vice president and chief medical officer for Banfield. “In short, unhealthy teeth can lead to an unhealthy pet in ways pet owners can’t imagine.”

Experts emphasize that prevention is the best medicine. For example, Banfield hospitals, most of which are located in PetSmart stores nationwide, include comprehensive dental care in two of their Optimum Wellness Plan options, which are packages of preventive care services. In addition to regular exams, Banfield recommends that pet owners brush their pets’ teeth every day, or at least two or three times a week. Feeding pets firm kibble can help slow down plaque formation, as can dental chew toys and dental-specific water additives.

“In addition to professional cleanings, our veterinarians are trained to provide a manageable at-home dental plan that pet owners can easily follow,” said Karen Johnson, DVM, vice president and client advocate for Banfield. “At Banfield, preventive care is the cornerstone of our practice — to us, proper dental care is just as important to the long-term health of a pet as routine vaccinations.”

For more information or to find a local Banfield hospital, visit www.banfield.net.

Tips to Keep Your Smile Dazzling

<b>Tips to Keep Your Smile Dazzling</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – When it comes to making a great first impression, nothing’s more important than a friendly smile. But not everyone feels confident enough to truly dazzle — after all, few smiles appear Hollywood-bright.

Coffee, tea, nicotine, soda, some fruit juices, silver-colored fillings and age can all give teeth a yellowish cast. No wonder drug store shelves are lined with whitening products that promise lighter teeth.

But whitening products aren’t perfect. Many users experience tooth and gum sensitivity and gum irritation, and prolonged use can damage tooth enamel.

At-home remedies don’t provide a better alternative. Brushing with baking soda can scratch resins and porcelain veneers, making stains more likely to adhere to those surfaces. Stain-removing toothpastes, which should not be confused with “whitening” products, are abrasive, and should only be used under a dentist’s supervision.

So what can you do to preserve a younger-looking, whiter smile? Here are some tips to keep you smiling pretty:

* Watch what you drink. If a beverage can stain cups, clothing and carpets, chances are that it can also stain your teeth. Even if you cannot give up coffee or cola indefinitely, you can take steps to lessen their toll on your teeth. For example, drink coffee or soda in one or two sittings instead of sipping on them slowly throughout the day. Follow sugary or acidic beverages with water, which will wash away their residue.

* Snack healthy. Foods like celery, carrots, pears and apples trigger saliva-production. The more saliva in your mouth, the less likely you are to develop stains or tooth decay.

* Use probiotics. Oral care probiotics, such as those found in Oragenic’s EvoraPlus probiotic mints (www.MyEvoraPlus.com), can help whiten teeth without causing sensitivity or irritation. The mints contain Probiora3, a patented blend of beneficial bacteria that, when allowed to colonize the mouth, prevent bad bacteria from establishing in the mouth and threatening tooth and gum health. The mints will whiten your teeth even if you continue to drink staining beverages — the bacteria constantly release low levels of hydrogen peroxide, a natural whitener, so your teeth are constantly being lightened throughout the day.

* Avoid using tobacco products. Nicotine stains teeth and leads to bad breath and gum disease, not to mention several types of oral cancer. Do yourself a favor and quit.