Oral Health Tips for a Timeless Smile

It is well known that taking care of your body, including your teeth and gums, is an important part of healthy aging. Yet, despite recognizing the importance of oral health, many individuals are not taking the essential steps to maintain their smile.

According to a 2008 study by the American Dental Association, Crest and Oral-B, “The Public Speaks Up on Oral Health Care: An ADA and Crest/Oral-B Survey,” more than eight in 10 adults aged 50 to 64 believe maintaining healthy teeth and gums is essential to overall good health, yet only a third say they’re taking the proper steps to do so. That’s exactly the kind of statistic that has health experts worried.

Help Your Kids Choose Tooth-Friendly Foods

You probably know that sweets and soda are bad for your children’s teeth, but have you stopped to think about what foods are good for their teeth?

Some foods support kids’ dental health. Keep these foods in mind the next time you pack your children’s lunches:

•    Look for vegetables high in vitamin A. Veggies like pumpkin, sweet potatoes, broccoli and carrots are high in vitamin A, which is important in the formation of tooth enamel. Try packing baby carrots in children’s lunchboxes or making homemade, baked sweet potato fries.

Prepare for Mistletoe: Keep Your Breath Fresh

The holidays bring culinary delights, ranging from sparking cocktails to potato latkes to Yule logs. Many bemoan the effects of extra calories when it comes to pants sizes, but few consider what all that celebrating does to the mouth.

Every time we eat sugary foods, we feed the destructive bacteria that live in our mouths. As the bacteria chow down, they release an acid. The acid wears down tooth enamel, leading to cavities and eventually to gum disease. As gum disease is the number-one cause of halitosis, or bad breath, indulging in too many hearty nogs and sugar cookies could leave you standing alone under the mistletoe.

Want a “Fresh from the Dentist” Smile?

People love to experience that “fresh from the dentist” feeling, when the tip of the tongue glides effortlessly and smoothly over a freshly cleaned set of pearly whites. So, why not have that feeling all of the time?

If you want a healthy mouth, follow these tips:

•    Brush regularly. Yes, you’ve heard it over and over: brush your teeth twice every day. It also helps to brush after eating and snacking, whenever possible. Brushing keeps small food particles from becoming food for harmful bacteria. If possible, brush for a full two minutes.

Allergies Could Be Causing Your Bad Breath

If you find that your sniffling, sneezing and runny eyes are accompanied by mouth odor, you’re not alone; seasonal allergies are associated with halitosis, or bad breath.

Bad breath is caused by the same destructive bacteria that cause plaque and gum disease. They live in the mouth, where they feed on carbohydrates consumed as food. In a healthy mouth, these bacteria are kept in check by saliva production. Saliva washes away the bacteria, so they have less time to stick to teeth, eat sugar and emit smelly gas as a byproduct.

Six Tips for a Healthier "Fresh From the Dentist" Smile

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – People love to experience that “fresh from the dentist” feeling, when the tip of the tongue glides effortlessly and smoothly over a freshly cleaned set of pearly whites. So, why not have that feeling all of the time?
If you want a healthier-feeling mouth, follow these tips:
* Brush regularly. Yes, you’ve heard it over and over: brush your teeth twice every day. It also helps to brush after eating and snacking whenever possible. Brushing keeps small food particles from becoming food for harmful bacteria. If possible, brush for a full two minutes.
* Drink green tea. A study published in the Journal of Periodontology in 2009, found that routine consumption of green tea may help promote healthy teeth and gums. Of the 940 men evaluated, the study found that those who regularly drank green tea had superior periodontal health than subjects who consumed less green tea.
* Use probiotics. The use of products like EvoraPlus probiotic mints (www.myevoraplus.com) goes a long way in securing a good base for oral care. The probiotic mints add beneficial bacteria to the mouth, leaving less room for harmful bacteria to grow.
* Floss once a day. Flossing helps clean and remove tartar where your toothbrush cannot reach.
* Irrigate the teeth and gums daily. Oral irrigation helps to remove food particles trapped below the gum line. The addition of an antimicrobial fluid in your irrigator can further help remove the plaque that harbors harmful bacteria.
* Take nutrition seriously. Avoiding sugar is key, but also watch out for simple or highly refined carbohydrates. Consume plenty of vitamin C, as it plays a vital role for building healthy gums and helps boost the immune system. One of the best defenses against poor oral health is a strong immune system — and healthy food is your best source of essential vitamins and minerals.

Why Parents Shouldn’t Dismiss Tooth Sensitivity in Children

Children’s smiling faces will bring joy to most parents. A toothache, however, can quickly turn a child’s smile into a frown. If your little one reports tooth sensitivity or pain, it may be time to visit a dentist. But if your child has no pain or sensitivity, you’ll still want to use the best preventive techniques.

Tips to Keep Preschoolers’ Teeth Healthy

Preschoolers’ smiling teeth do more than just bring joy to the people who see them. Kids’ teeth also help them chew and speak, and they create space in the jaw for adult teeth to grow in straight. Unfortunately, these “baby teeth” are also prone to early childhood caries or baby bottle tooth decay, also known as cavities.

How do preschoolers develop cavities? As in adults, children’s mouths are filled with bacteria. Whenever a child consumes sugar or starch, the bacteria feed on the sugar, releasing acid as a byproduct. This acid can break down the outer layer of the tooth, creating cavities.

Tips to Keep Preschoolers’ Teeth Healthy

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Preschoolers’ smiling teeth do more than just bring joy to the people who see them. Preschoolers’ teeth also help them chew and speak, and they create space in the jaw for adult teeth to grow in straight. Unfortunately, these “baby teeth” are also prone to early childhood caries or baby bottle tooth decay, also known as cavities.

How do preschoolers develop cavities? As in adults, children’s mouths are filled with bacteria. Whenever a child consumes sugar or starch, the bacteria feed on the sugar, releasing acid as a byproduct. This acid can break down the outer layer of the tooth, creating cavities.

So, how can parents ensure that preschoolers’ teeth stay healthy? Here are some tips:

* Keep preschoolers’ teeth clean. By the time a child has reached age 2 to 5, they should be on their way to caring for their own teeth. By age three, they should have a full set of baby teeth. Most children at this age will want to brush their teeth on their own, but it is important to supervise and help them until they are doing it correctly. Do a quick follow-up brushing if necessary with a soft-bristled tooth brush.

* Use probiotics. Oral care probiotics can be an effective step in a preschooler’s oral care routine. If left unchecked, bad

bacteria can overwhelm the mouth, possibly leading to tooth decay. EvoraKids (www.myevorakids.com), a chewable containing a special blend of oral care probiotics designed for children, works by flooding the mouth with good bacteria, which adhere to tooth surfaces, including crevices, pits and fissures in the chewing surfaces, helping to promote happy smiles. It supports tooth health by balancing the bacteria in the mouth.

* Limit sweets. Sugar produces an acid that removes calcium from teeth, thereby breaking down the enamel. Only give children fruit for snacks, not cookies or crackers with refined sugar. If you do keep sweets in your house, only give children candy that they can consume all at once. Always make them brush their teeth soon after eating candy to remove any sugars that may still be sitting in the mouth.

* Avoid sharing silverware with your child. Never put your mouth on anything that will enter your child’s mouth — children aren’t born with destructive bacteria in the mouth, they catch them from mom and dad.

Probiotics May Boost Oral Health

If yogurt sales are any indication, Americans have accepted the idea that probiotic foods – those that contain beneficial bacteria – can improve health. But “good” bacteria don’t just live in the digestive system. Now, one company has developed a probiotic mint that can promote optimal oral health.

The human mouth teems with bacteria. But contrary to popular belief, not all of those bacteria are to blame for bad breath and tooth decay. Good bacteria actually promote better oral health – they keep gums healthy and breath fresh. It’s only when “bad” bacteria overpopulate the mouth that mouth odor, tooth decay and gum disease occur.