Refreshing Communities Through Outdoor Gardens

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Most Americans believe that before Europeans settled the New World, the continents were largely uninhabited. But when Columbus arrived in the Americas in 1492 there were at least 56 million people living here.
Over 90 percent of the indigenous population was decimated within two generations from disease and war. But the Native American “Indians” left behind over 200,000 incredible pyramid-shaped mounds, complex earthworks (the largest in the world) and walled cities. Today, fewer than 1,000 major mound sites remain.
“America’s Mound Builders created massive earth formations and mounds, and Native American earthworks are actually the biggest and most complex in the world. It’s an archaeological treasure that goes largely unrecognized by the public. One mound complex in Illinois has a pyramid mound over 110 feet high, and its base is larger than the Great Pyramid in Egypt,” stated Dr. Greg Little, author of “The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Native American Mounds & Earthworks.”
“There’s a mystery there,” Little continued. “There is a massive stone chamber inside it that has never been excavated.”
The oldest known mound in the U.S. is in Louisiana, dating back to 3,700 B.C., but all along the Atlantic coast are massive shell mound complexes nearly as old.
“It’s highly likely that there are older mounds hidden in shallow water along the coast that were inundated at the end of the last Ice Age,” Little said. “The Native Americans were building pyramid-shaped mounds more than a thousand years before the Egyptians were, and they can be found in nearly every state.”
In today’s economy Little says that people should consider family vacation trips to the larger archaeological parks and museums that have been established at these major mound sites. Most of these parks and museums have a nominal charge or none at all.
“It’s a way to engage children in our lost or forgotten history and is a great way to teach children about indigenous cultures. Almost every state has a couple major sites,” Little added.
For more information, visit www.apmagazine.info.

Archaeological Wonders In Your Neighborhood

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – What do Newark, Ohio, Epps, La., Marquette, Iowa and the state of Illinois have in common? They are all sites of some of the most impressive archaeological wonders found anywhere in the world — and most seasoned tourists have no idea.
Native American mounds and earthworks are some of the more underappreciated archaeological treasures in the world, but a new “Top 10” list is now highlighting these attractions. The list of America’s Indian mounds and earthworks was formed from the authoritative book “The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Native American Mounds & Earthworks” and has been widely quoted by travel sites.
Still, few people are aware of the existence of these incredible wonders. The encyclopedia is packed with over 500 photos, and details 1,000 sites that can be visited in 41 states.
American mound building began 5,800 years ago, long before the pyramids of Egypt were even conceived. The number-one site is a massive set of geometric earthworks and mounds centered in Newark, Ohio. It is the largest set of earthworks in the entire world. One part of the site has a large circular wall that encloses 30 acres in downtown Newark.
The Newark site is in pristine condition, and it oddly serves as America’s most unique golf course. It’s an unusual vacation spot and was built 2,500 years ago.
The earthen ridges near Epps, La., are 6 feet high and 80 feet wide and served as platforms for houses and thousands of people. Many of the most impressive sites are found in huge parks with museums, tours and displays. Some mound sites even conduct Native American dances and ceremonies that are open to the public.
Illinois is home to Monk’s Mound, concealing a huge stone chamber that’s never been opened. This massive pyramid is the tallest mound, standing at 100 feet with a base larger than the Great Pyramid in Egypt. Near Marquette, Iowa, is Effigy Mounds National Monument with 200 mounds shaped into the forms of animals. Check out www.apmagazine.info for more details.

Archaeological Delights on American Soil

What do Newark, Ohio, Epps, La., Marquette, Iowa and the state of Illinois have in common? They are all sites of some of the most impressive archaeological wonders found anywhere in the world–and most seasoned tourists have no idea.

Native American mounds and earthworks are one of the more underappreciated archaeological treasures in the world, but a new “Top 10” list is now highlighting these attractions. The list of America’s Indian mounds and earthworks was formed from the authoritative book “The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Native American Mounds & Earthworks” and has been widely quoted by travel sites.

Keep Pests Out of Your Yard and Home

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – When ants invade pantries, or fleas infest the family pet, Americans shriek, jump on chairs and start squashing. But if you really want to keep bugs out of your house, you will have to look to your lawn.

Keeping ants, ticks, fleas and other insects away from the exterior of your home will help keep them out of the interior. But some pest-removal methods prove more effective than others. According to a recent survey conducted by the maker of Spectracide herbicides and pesticides, American homeowners have attempted to kill ants with magnifying glasses, through drowning and by setting ant mounds on fire.

Using a pesticide is far safer than setting a bonfire. Better yet, pesticides actually work. That said, some pesticides are more appropriate than others. For example, if you’re dealing with lawn and garden pests that attack plants and flowers, choose a liquid pesticide. Spectracide advises users of its Triazicide Insect Killer Once & Done to use a concentrate with a tank sprayer for widespread infestations, ready-to-spray formulations for covering entire lawns and ready-to-use spray bottles for smaller jobs.

Bugs that live in the soil, like ants and grubs, are best killed through granules. To rid a large area of soil-dwelling insects, apply granules with a lawn spreader. To treat smaller areas, like an ant mound, pour granules directly from the canister. After distributing the granules, water them if indicated on the label.

For especially hardy pests, like fire ants, look for insect-specific pesticides. Spectracide brand, for example, makes a product called Fire Ant Killer Plus Preventer Bait Once & Done in the form of granules. Worker ants confuse the granules with food and take them into the mound to feed their queen, poisoning her. Because only the queen reproduces, killing the queen destroys the fire ant colony.

Homeowners can also destroy mounds that appear on their property using a contact killer like Spectracide Fire Ant Killer Mound Destroyer Granules, which kills fire ants on contact, eliminating the colony and mound. Children and pets can re-enter a sprayed area once the application has dried.

Spectracide brand’s Web site has educational guides available for download, as well as online videos that offer tips for selecting and applying pesticides. For more information, visit www.spectracide.com.