Women: Simple Tips to Identify Migraine Triggers

You enjoy a glass of red wine, but an hour later, even the dimmest lights make your head throb. Coincidence? Probably not.

Migraine headaches – those chronic, severe headaches that typically cause intense, crippling pain that is often accompanied by nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound – have triggers, or factors and events that make them more likely to occur. Not every migraine sufferer has the same triggers, and the same migraine sufferer might not react to her triggers the same way every time. Sometimes, it’s not a single trigger, but a series of triggers that cause the migraine. For example, a woman might not get a migraine from skipping a meal, but might get a migraine from skipping a meal on a day in which she’s had inadequate sleep or too much caffeine.

Women: Identify Your Migraine Triggers

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Migraines — those chronic, severe headaches that cause intense, crippling pain that is often accompanied by nausea, and sensitivity to light and sound — have triggers, or a variety of factors and events that make them more likely to occur.

Not every migraine sufferer has the same triggers, and the same migraine sufferer might not react to her triggers the same way every time. Sometimes, it’s not a single trigger, but a series of triggers that cause the migraine. For example, a woman might not get a migraine from skipping a meal, but might get a migraine from skipping a meal on a day in which she’s had inadequate sleep or too much caffeine.

Women are three times as likely to have migraines as men, and their triggers may be slightly different. According to the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. National Library of Medicine, many women with migraines experience the following triggers:

* Too much or too little sleep

* Skipped meals

* Hormone changes during the menstrual cycle

* Stress

* Weather changes

* Alcohol (often red wine)

* Caffeine

* Foods that contain nitrates, MSG, tyramine or aspartame

* Bright lights

* Strong odors

The good news? Identifying migraine triggers can help women avoid migraines. Women experiencing migraines should start keeping a migraine diary. Every time they have a headache, they can write down where they were and what they doing, what they ate 24 hours before the attack, and what day of their period they were on when the headache started. This can help them identify patterns. For example, if a woman gets migraines whenever she has a hot dog with Diet Coke, she might be sensitive to nitrates, aspartame and caffeine.

Of course, women can’t always avoid migraine triggers like weather changes or too little sleep, so it’s a good idea to keep a migraine treatment on hand. One all-natural migraine remedy, Lipigesic M, uses feverfew and ginger to reduce the inflammation that causes migraine headaches.

For more information, visit www.lipigesic.com.

Is Your Pain Medication Making Your Migraines Worse?

When you feel that throbbing pain on one side of your face, you reach for your migraine medication. After all, no one wants to waste a day cowering in pain. But if you’re experiencing migraine headaches more often or your migraines are getting steadily worse, your pain relief pills could be to blame.

Taking too many pain medications too often – as little as three times a week or 10 times a month – can put your migraines in a rebound cycle. Your body becomes accustomed to the pain medication being in your system, so when it wears off, you start to get another headache – prompting you to take more medication. Any painkiller can cause rebound headaches, though doctors think that drugs containing caffeine, aspirin and acetaminophen, and ergotamines and triptans carry the most risk.

Women: Don’t Let Migraines Take Over Your Life

According to the National Headache Foundation, many women report that migraine headaches make them feel like they’re losing control of their own lives. But women can take steps to keep migraines from interfering with day-to-day activities.

Migraine is the most common form of disabling headache, affecting about 50 million Americans. About 75 percent of the Americans suffering migraines are women. Doctors believe that fluctuations in hormone levels, which women undergo until menopause, may be responsible.