Sweat Overload? Replenish Your Essential Minerals

Most adults know daily cardio is great for burning fat and reducing stress, but you may not know that a rise in sweat output can cause an increase in your loss of essential minerals, such as magnesium.*

People drink water after they exercise to rehydrate, but individuals need to replenish more than just H2O. Mineral loss through the excretion of sweat and urine is increased during prolonged exercise. Due to how much they sweat, it’s crucial for endurance athletes with low magnesium intakes to replenish their magnesium levels [www.slowmag.com].*

Physical Activity Increases Loss of Essential Mineral

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Most adults know that daily cardio is great for burning fat and reducing stress, but you may not know that a rise in sweat output can cause an increase in your loss of essential minerals, such as magnesium.*
People drink water after they exercise to rehydrate, but individuals need to replenish more than just H2O. Mineral loss through the excretion of sweat and urine is increased during prolonged exercise. Due to how much they sweat, it’s crucial for endurance athletes with low magnesium intakes to replenish their magnesium levels.*
Endurance athletes sweat at a rate of one to one-and-a-half liters per hour. They also have greater risk for magnesium imbalance because of a high excretion rate and the length of their training sessions. For example, in 70 degree weather, the average loss of magnesium via sweat during a 40 minute-run is over seven milligrams.*
Magnesium is necessary for many different reasons, especially energy and endurance needs. It activates enzymes known as ATPases, which are needed to transfer and release energy for muscle contractions.* During exercise, adequate levels of magnesium, maintained by a healthy diet and a daily supplement such as Slow-Mag Tablets, can really come in handy.
This process is what produces the energy source needed to exercise efficiently. Low levels of magnesium may be associated with limited energy efficiency, reduced metabolic efficiency and increased oxygen consumption and heart rate during aerobic activity.*
Studies have shown a relationship between sweat magnesium loss and muscle cramps.* An astounding 7 out of 10 Americans don’t get enough magnesium from their diet. The amount of magnesium you need each day is based on your age, sex and other factors.*
Since magnesium functions in many processes necessary for exercise performance, it is important for athletes to have adequate magnesium levels. To help figure out if you’re meeting the daily requirement, use the magnesium calculator at www.slowmag.com.
How much magnesium are you getting each day? Learn how you can supplement what you’re missing. Plus, there are articles and videos on why magnesium is necessary and how to get more of it–all available online.

Portion Control: The Key to Weight Loss

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – The rigors of appearing on the reality TV show The Biggest Loser led Lisa Mosley to the emotional breakthrough that empowered her to lose almost 100 pounds. But it was portion control that kept her losing weight when she returned home from the set.
“I live on the motto “Moderation not deprivation,” she says. “As soon as I got home from the ranch, I started using a small plate instead of big dinner plates. It has been extremely successful for me.”
Mosley didn’t start gaining weight until she was about 20, when she began taking medication for a chronic anxiety disorder. The medication made her feel like a new person, but within six months she began to gain weight. Over the next 10 years she gained about 120 pounds.
By 2010, Lisa had suffered several personal setbacks. She had been laid off from her job, had lost her home and had no prospects to find work. The defining moment in her struggle to lose weight came when she discovered that her daughter had stopped eating and drinking because she didn’t want to be heavy like her mom.
That spurred Lisa to take action, including her willingness to bare her soul on The Biggest Loser.
When Lisa left the show, she had dropped 60 pounds. But she continued to lose weight, dropping another 37 pounds at home after she learned to control the size of her portions.
She recently became the national spokeswoman for Yum Yum Dishes, sets of hand-painted 4-ounce ceramic bowls. Tracy Adler, mother of two and former restaurant owner, created the bowls to help parents and kids control the size of their snacks.
“The idea for these dishes is what got me through this,” Mosley says. “A lot of times when I have entered into diets in the past, I went into it thinking I am never going to get a cookie, ice cream, or a piece of cake again. I was never successful with that,” she adds. “These dishes remind you that your life isn’t over and you are not going to be missing out.”
Today Mosley works as a fitness boot camp instructor and personal trainer. She weighs about 190 pounds, wears a size 12 and is happy with herself.
“I am literally a different person,” she says, “not just in how I feel physically but also how I feel mentally and emotionally.”
For more information, visit www.yumyumdishes.com.

Get Out of the Dark With Routine Eye Exams

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Every five seconds, someone goes blind, but in 80 percent of the cases, the blindness is preventable. Blindness from eye disease is often treatable, but only if it’s noticed early through routine eye exams.
To help prevent avoidable vision loss, EyeCare America, a public service program of the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, is offering free eye exams by volunteer ophthalmologists dedicated to a worthy cause. Ophthalmologists are medical doctors who specialize in eye and vision care, from glasses to complex surgeries.
“More than 45 million people worldwide are blind,” says Richard P. Mills, MD. “In many cases, the most severe eye diseases offer no warning signs, until it’s too late and vision loss is irreversible. But regular eye exams can help you catch problems early, while there is still time to treat conditions and prevent permanent loss of sight.”
EyeCare America provides year-round eye exams at no out-of-pocket cost to people age 65 and over. Eye exams are provided by a corps of nearly 7,000 EyeCare America ophthalmologists across the U.S. and Puerto Rico.
People who are interested
in the program can visit www.eyecareamerica.org to see if they are eligible. The organization’s online referral center also enables friends and family members to find out instantly if their loved ones are eligible to be matched with an ophthalmologist.
While some eye diseases, such as cataracts, progress slowly and offer symptoms, serious eye problems, such as glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy, often offer few or no warning signs. They can be caught and treated in the early stages through a medical eye exam when preventive care is still possible. By the time these conditions do begin to show symptoms, such as blurred vision or black spots across the field of vision, often vision loss is irreversible.
EyeCare America provides services to medically under-served seniors and those at a high risk for eye disease. Since its inception, EyeCare America has helped over 1.5 million people.

Daily Supplement Proven to Help With Osteoarthritis

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – New research using cutting-edge Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) for the first time confirms that pharmaceutical grade chondroitin sulphate (CSbBIO-ACTIVE) significantly helps reduce the effects of osteoarthritis in the knee.
Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting 27 million people in the U.S. alone. Over time, this condition leads to breakdown of the cartilage and other parts of the joint, causing stiffness, pain and loss of movement. Cartilage is a firm, rubbery covering on the ends of joint bones that reduces friction and acts as a shock absorber. With osteoarthritis, the cartilage loses elasticity and wears away; without the cushioning cartilage provides, the bones can rub against each other. Cartilage deterioration can affect the shape and makeup of the joint so it no longer functions smoothly. Also, bruises called bone marrow lesions can develop inside the bone and may cause knee pain.
Trial results recently published in a leading arthritis journal showed that chondroitin sulphate treatment significantly reduced cartilage loss and bone marrow lesions from osteoarthritis of the knee.
Chondroitin is a natural substance in the body that helps keep cartilage healthy by absorbing fluid and providing building blocks to produce new cartilage. Chondroitin may also block enzymes that break down cartilage.
Recent advances in MRI made it possible for Dr. Jean-Pierre Pelletier and his team at University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre in Canada to measure for the first time the impact of chondroitin sulfate on cartilage loss and other changes to the joint, including bone marrow lesions. The latest technology enabled researchers to measure and demonstrate significant improvements after treatment with chondroitin sulphate.
By six months, patients showed significantly less cartilage loss compared with those receiving placebo. By 12 months, treatment significantly decreased bone marrow lesion size.
“Reducing bone marrow lesions may help lessen some of the pain associated with osteoarthritis,” said Dr. Pelletier. “From these results, we can conclude that chondroitin sulfate is a safe drug that significantly reduces the volume of cartilage loss and slows down the progression of osteoarthritis in the knee.” He notes, “Patients must be provided highly purified pharmaceutical-grade chondroitin sulphate, the one used in this study, as this is the only one that can guarantee such efficacy and specifically, safety results.”

Get the Facts About Cataracts and Surgery

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Though cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss worldwide, myths persist about their cause and treatment. Cataracts affect nearly 22 million Americans age 40 and older. By age 80, more than half of all Americans will have cataracts, according to the National Eye Institute.
“Cataracts are not preventable, but they are treatable,” said Richard P. Mills, MD, “and the best way to ensure vision stays healthy for a lifetime is to schedule a visit with an ophthalmologist. More than 90 percent of the people who have cataract surgery regain useful vision.”
As the eye’s lens, located behind the pupil, grows older, its cells die and accumulate. The result is blurred vision and “fuzzy” images. Eye injuries, certain medications and diseases such as diabetes are also known to cause cataracts. In the early stages, stronger lighting and eyeglasses may lessen vision problems caused by cataracts. But at a certain point, cataract surgery — the most frequently performed operation in the country — may be necessary. There are four common cataract myths to dispel:
* MYTH 1: Eye drops can prevent or dissolve cataracts.
o FACT: The Food and Drug Administration has not approved any drops that cure or delay cataracts. Since cataracts are not a substance, there is nothing for the drops to dissolve.
* MYTH 2: Close-up tasks like reading or sewing make cataracts worse.
o FACT: Cataracts are not caused by how people use their eyes. However, cataracts likely become more noticeable during close work. One sign of a cataract is the need for more light to do the same activities.
* MYTH 3: Cataracts are reversible.
o FACT: The lens naturally clouds as it ages; this process is unavoidable and irreversible. But its progress can be slowed by quitting smoking, eating a balanced diet and wearing sunglasses.
If you are age 65 and older and you think you have cataracts, you may qualify for a free eye exam. The eye exams are provided by a program called EyeCare America, an organization that works with nearly 7,000 volunteer ophthalmologists across the U.S. and Puerto Rico. Visit www.eyecareamerica.org to see if you or a loved one qualifies for this care.

When Alzheimer’s Isn’t Alzheimer’s

Data from many studies suggest that the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise. However, many of the symptoms associated with early Alzheimer’s disease are the same as those associated with hearing loss.

According to a recent study led by Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD, of Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, the risk of dementia increased among participants with at least a mild 25-decibel hearing loss. Participants with more severe hearing loss were most likely to be diagnosed with dementia – and even Alzheimer’s. The relationship between Alzheimer’s and hearing loss should come as no surprise. After all, you can’t remember what someone said if you didn’t hear them say it.

Concerned About Alzheimer’s? It Might Be Hearing Loss Instead

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Data from many studies suggest that the incidence of Alzheimer’s disease is on the rise. However, many of the symptoms associated with early Alzheimer’s disease are the same as those associated with hearing loss.
According to a recent study led by Frank R. Lin, MD, PhD, of Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, the risk of dementia increased among participants with at least a mild 25-decibel hearing loss. Participants with more severe hearing loss were most likely to be diagnosed with dementia — and even Alzheimer’s. The relationship between Alzheimer’s and hearing loss should come as no surprise. After all, you can’t remember what someone said if you didn’t hear them say it.
Several symptoms are common to both Alzheimer’s and untreated hearing loss. These symptoms include depression, anxiety, feelings of isolation, and problems talking and understanding what is being said. In addition, people with either Alzheimer’s or unidentified hearing loss may have inappropriate responses to social cues, lower scores on tests of mental function, attitudes of denial, defensiveness or negativity and increased distrust of others’ motives, even those of family and friends. Individuals with unidentified hearing loss may appear paranoid and excessively concerned that others are talking about them.
“Untreated hearing loss is a significant quality-of-life issue,” said Sreek Cherukuri, MD, a board-certified ear, nose and throat physician based in Chicago, Ill. “It can cause marital and family strain, lead to social isolation, depression and anxiety. And the solution is so simple.”
To help more people improve their lives by improving their hearing, Dr. Cherukuri designed the MDHearingAid, a comfortable, cost-effective way to improve hearing. “I could see no reason why we couldn’t develop a quality hearing instrument for about the price of an iPhone,” he said.
If you are concerned about a loved one who is experiencing any of the symptoms mentioned above, talk to a doctor about testing for hearing loss. In several studies, even patients with Alzheimer’s showed improved ability to understand and communicate after they were fitted with hearing aids.
“Our mission is to remove cost as an obstacle for the millions with hearing loss that cannot afford a custom hearing aid,” said Dr. Cherukuri.
For more information about a safe, affordable way to improve hearing loss, visit www.MDHearingAid.com or call 800-873-0680.

Is Your Cat’s Bad Breath Saying Something?

How many times has your cat come to wake you up by rubbing his face against your face in the morning? Your cat looks adorable, but the odor coming from his mouth may make his affection less than welcome. Of course, you want to freshen your cat’s breath, but before you look into kitty breath mints, you might want to make an appointment with your veterinarian.

While post-tuna halitosis is no cause for concern, your cat’s breath should not stink consistently. If you notice unrelenting bad breath, your cat might be suffering from an undetected health issue, such as oral disease or diabetes. If you notice the following smells, have your cat examined by a vet:

Program Helps Kids See More Clearly

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – There’s nothing quite like seeing the world through a baby’s eyes, when everything from patterned carpet to the family cat becomes new and wondrous. And there’s a reason for all that fascination. Early in life, the brain and its visual pathways mature rapidly, developing the child’s ability to process visual feedback.
Those born with eye problems need quick intervention if they are ever to experience normal vision. For example, doctors often recommend that babies born with pediatric cataracts, or opaque areas on the eye lens, receive corrective surgery before they are six weeks old.
Pediatric cataracts are rare in developed nations, affecting one to four children in every 100,000 births. Most babies born with cataracts end up with normal vision, thanks to a surgery that removes the affected lens.
But children in developing nations may be 10 times as likely to be born with cataracts, and most don’t have easy access to surgeons. Left untreated, cataracts lead to blindness, which impacts future educational opportunities and the ability to earn income. One study found that, over 10 years, the global economic loss stemming from pediatric cataracts is somewhere between $1 billion and $6 billion.
Luckily, some charitable organizations are working to help children escape lifelong impairment. For example, Lions Clubs International Foundation partnered with the Bausch + Lomb Early Vision Institute to create a new program, the Pediatric Cataract Initiative. The Pediatric Cataract Initiative will identify, fund and promote methods that will help treat pediatric cataracts in undeveloped areas.
Most cataracts are preventable or treatable. When successfully treated with surgery and proper follow-up care, most children with pediatric cataracts will need little, if any, visual correction as adults.
“Too many newborns afflicted with pediatric cataract have a lifetime of vision loss and blindness ahead of them — an untenable prospect in today’s world,” said Paul Sartori, corporate vice president, Bausch + Lomb. “With more funding and attention placed on research, prevention and treatment, we’ll be making an impact on the lives of children worldwide.”
To learn how you can help, visit www.PediatricCataract.org.