Wholesome Homemade Fruit Roll Up Recipe for Hungry Kids

America is the nation of snackers. We crunch, dip, dunk and miniaturize any tasty morsel we can get our hands on. Now, it’s in the genes — we’ve created generations full of kids who are snack-loving, on-the-go eaters.

A national survey of moms conducted by California Raisins found that half of their children enjoy at least one to two snacks daily, with another 44 percent saying snacks are the norm for their kids three to four times each day. Participating moms said there are two deciding factors that determine what snacks make it into the shopping cart. First, is it healthy? Second, does it receive a thumbs up or down from the peanut gallery of picky eaters?

Planning for Comfort During Long Road Trips

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Road trips can provide a great source of tunes, good conversation and relaxation throughout any travel season. However, long hours on the road can often result in body aches, poor nutrition and other challenges for drivers stuck behind the wheel.
To avoid such pitfalls and make the experience a bit less taxing on the body, champion Porsche race car driver Patrick Long has developed a set of guidelines for drivers everywhere. Long, an American Le Mans Series race car driver who can be in his car for up to 12 hours at a time, recommends these tips for any kind of distance driving:
Fuel-Up: If you pack a small cooler with water bottles and healthy snacks like fruits and veggies, this can deter the temptation to reach for non-healthy items on the road.
Stability: Stability should be your number-one concern when taking a long road trip. Many people stick pillows behind their backs for lumbar support, but the main goal is to always have your spine straight. Sit with the seat fully contacting your back; allow the structure of the seat to do its job in supporting your spine.
Body Positioning: Maintain proper posture by not leaning one way or the other in the seat. According to the National Highway and Traffic Safety Authority, a driver’s hands should both be placed on the outside of the steering wheel on opposite sides. Long recommends the “9 and 3” hand position. Having proper position in the car is also relative to the pedals — if you’re too close you’re cramped. If you’re too far away, you’ll end up slouching down to reach them. Sit close enough to the wheel so there’s a slight bend at your elbows and keep your arms relaxed.
Take Frequent Pit Stops: For longer-distance road adventures, take frequent pit stops in order to stretch your legs and improve the blood flow in your body. To prevent a sore lower back experienced after driving, focus on core stability and strength exercises. Long suggests planks, leg lifts and crunches on an exercise ball to strengthen your core.
To find more information about Long, check out www.porsche.com/usa.

Don’t Let Lack of Comfort Cramp Your Road Trip

Road trips can provide a great source of tunes, good conversation and relaxation throughout any travel season. However, long hours on the road can often result in body aches, poor nutrition and other challenges for drivers stuck behind the wheel.

To avoid such pitfalls and make the experience a bit less taxing on the body, champion Porsche race car driver Patrick Long has developed a set of guidelines for drivers everywhere. Long, an American Le Mans Series race car driver who can be in his car for up to 12 hours at a time, recommends these tips for any kind of distance driving:

Prepare Your Vehicle for Fall

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Road trips can provide a great source of tunes, good conversation and relaxation throughout any travel season. However, long hours on the road can often result in body aches, poor nutrition and other challenges for drivers stuck behind the wheel.
To avoid such pitfalls and make the experience a bit less taxing on the body, champion Porsche race car driver Patrick Long has developed a set of guidelines for drivers everywhere. Long, an American Le Mans Series race car driver who can be in his car for up to 12 hours at a time, recommends these tips for any kind of distance driving:
Fuel-Up: If you pack a small cooler with water bottles and healthy snacks like fruits and veggies, this can deter the temptation to reach for non-healthy items on the road.
Stability: Stability should be your number-one concern when taking a long road trip. Many people stick pillows behind their backs for lumbar support, but the main goal is to always have your spine straight. Sit with the seat fully contacting your back; allow the structure of the seat to do its job in supporting your spine.
Body Positioning: Maintain proper posture by not leaning one way or the other in the seat. According to the National Highway and Traffic Safety Authority, a driver’s hands should both be placed on the outside of the steering wheel on opposite sides. Long recommends the “9 and 3” hand position. Having proper position in the car is also relative to the pedals — if you’re too close you’re cramped. If you’re too far away, you’ll end up slouching down to reach them. Sit close enough to the wheel so there’s a slight bend at your elbows and keep your arms relaxed.
Take Frequent Pit Stops: For longer-distance road adventures, take frequent pit stops in order to stretch your legs and improve the blood flow in your body. To prevent a sore lower back experienced after driving, focus on core stability and strength exercises. Long suggests planks, leg lifts and crunches on an exercise ball to strengthen your core.
To find more information about Long, check out www.porsche.com/usa.

School Physicals: The Easiest Exam Your Kids Will Take All Year

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Back-to-school physicals are an important step in any student’s school career. After all, going back to school is a hectic time, and a child’s performance in school can be affected by his health.

Many schools have health care requirements that must be met at the start of a new school year. Taking your child for a back-to-school physical will ensure that he will be able to handle the physical and psychological stress of school, while also giving you the opportunity to learn about important vaccines that will protect against diseases like meningitis and chicken pox.

Take Care Clinics offers these tips for parents who want to keep their kids healthy throughout the school year.

* Vaccinations. Stay up to date on all of your school’s vaccination recommendations. Visit a Take Care Clinic to find out which vaccinations are right for your child.

* Create a Bedtime Routine. Earlier wake-up times call for earlier bedtimes. Develop a regular bedtime routine to ensure your child is getting plenty of rest.

* Plan Healthy Meals. Nutritional breakfasts and lunches help your child stay focused and energized. Be sure to pack plenty of healthy snacks and low-sugar beverages.

* Keep Active. Make it a family affair by planning weekly bike rides, nature walks and other activities to ensure your child gets the exercise they need.

* Update Your Calendar. Set up a central family calendar to help you stay organized and manage your child’s busy schedule.

* Stay Safe. Be sure your child knows his phone number and address and is aware of school bus and playground safety rules.

* Physicals. Drop into your local Take Care Clinic for a convenient $30 back-to-school physical designed to help your child meet school health care requirements. Sports physicals are also available at clinics for the same price except in Kansas.

Take Care Clinics are open seven days a week and weeknights and can be found at select Walgreens. They combine best practices in health care and the expertise and personal care of its board-certified providers, Take Care Nurse Practitioners and Take Care Physician Assistants, to fill a critical need in America by providing easy access to health care.

For more information, visit TakeCareHealth.com.

A Step In the Right Direction: Finding the Path to Better Health

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Most Americans have tried to improve their health at some point — but for many, attempts to eat less and move more do not result in success. So, can Americans truly change bad habits? The National Institutes of Health says “Yes.” No person is too out-of-shape, overweight or old to improve their health.

That said, old habits die hard, and fad diets may do more harm than good. Americans who are serious about changing their habits need to make realistic and gradual changes one step at a time and at their own pace.

Think about what motivates you, what pitfalls have trapped you before and what eating and activity habits you truly enjoy. Then make a plan. There is no “one-size-fits-all” approach, so make goals that make sense to you. You can set a goal to eat oatmeal instead of a pastry for breakfast, or to park farther away from the grocery store when you shop.

Once you create your plan, track and evaluate your progress. The Weight-control Information Network (WIN), a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, offers the following tips to help you stay on task:

– Overcome your barriers. Ask family members or friends for support. If you know you can’t exercise later in the day, ask a coworker to accompany you on a walk at lunch. Plan ahead to avoid pitfalls. For example, if you usually snack on chips while you watch television, try eating air-popped popcorn or cut veggies and salsa.

– Reward yourself. When you reach a goal, buy yourself a new book or new gear or relax in a hot bath. Try to avoid rewarding yourself with high-calorie treats or time off from exercise.

– Add variety. It’s easy to get bored with one routine, so try new activities, foods and rewards.

– Plan ahead to avoid setbacks. Know what healthy activities you can enjoy in bad weather. If you know you’ll be on the go, pack healthy snacks and a lunch. Don’t give up after a setback — they happen. Simply regroup and start focusing on your goals again.

– Expand your goals. Revisit your goals, and look for new ways to challenge yourself. If you’re comfortable walking five days a week, try adding strength training. If you have successfully reduced your saturated fat intake, try limiting refined sugar.

For more information and healthy lifestyle tips, visit WIN at www.win.niddk.nih.gov.