Boomers: Don’t Take Old Age Laying Down

Many aging baby boomers expect to exercise well into their seventies, and most plan to live independently for as long as possible. Luckily, companies are designing products that help boomers retain their active lifestyles.

To help consumers find products that are easy to use at any age, the Arthritis Foundation developed its Ease of Use program, which employs testers with moderate-to-severe arthritis to evaluate products. The Arthritis Foundation provides the following tips for boomers unwilling to let age interfere with their favorite activities:

Boomers Refuse to Take Old Age Laying Down

<b>Boomers Refuse to Take Old Age Laying Down</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Many baby boomers expect to exercise well into their seventies, and most plan to live independently for as long as possible. Luckily, companies are designing products that help boomers retain their active lifestyles.

To help consumers find products that are easy to use at any age, the Arthritis Foundation developed its Ease of Use program, which employs testers with moderate-to-severe arthritis to evaluate products. The Arthritis Foundation provides the following tips for boomers unwilling to let age interfere with their favorite activities:

* Choose exercise equipment that reduces strain on joints. Baby boomers love their exercise, so it can be frustrating when knees, hips and backs protest after running or cycling. But there’s no reason that boomers can’t make adjustments that allow them to continue their favorite activities.

For example, gym rats can find indoor exercise equipment specifically designed to avoid straining hips, knees and shoulders. The NuStep 4000 Recumbent Cross Trainer received the Arthritis Foundation’s Ease-of-Use Commendation for its comfortable seat and ability to provide an effective upper- and lower-body workout without stressing joints.

* Make bathroom cleaning more accessible. Cleaning the bathroom can often be an arduous task. Bending and scrubbing can add unwanted pressure to joints and muscles. Products like Scrubbing Bubbles, an SC Johnson cleaning product, has incorporated innovative ways to ease unnecessary work from the necessary evil of cleaning the bathroom. Scrubbing Bubbles’ Automatic Shower Cleaner is a breakthrough cleaning system that automatically sprays cleaner to eliminate the buildup of tough soap scum and mold and mildew stains. The cleaning formula combines with the water on your shower walls to begin working immediately.

* Eliminate bending and kneeling. As you age, climbing on chairs to reach tall shelves or stooping to fish through low cabinets becomes less feasible. Designing your home to put your possessions in reach can help you stay independent as you age.

When purchasing cabinets or other storage spaces, look for features like adjustable shelving, pullouts and extensions. For example, The Diamond Logix 36 Inch SuperCabinet with Rollouts and Pullouts has three roll-out trays, dual storage and two wire pull-out baskets, so you don’t have to reach, kneel or bend to access items.

For more information, visit www.arthritis.org.

How to Be a Prepared Patient

<b>How to Be a Prepared Patient</b>“></td>
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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Aches and pains aren’t always readily attributable to a particular disease, and receiving a medical diagnosis often takes more than one doctor’s visit. Doctor-patient teamwork can help facilitate an efficient and proper diagnosis. Becoming an advocate for your own health and knowing the right questions to ask your doctor can help.

How can you take a more active role in helping your doctor understand your health condition? One simple solution provided by the Arthritis Foundation is to “Take P.A.R.T.

P – Prepare a list of questions, concerns and symptoms to discuss. Keep a detailed journal of your symptoms, including the times they occurred and associated environmental factors. For example, was a particular pain triggered by a certain food or activity?

A – Ask questions during your appointment. It’s a good idea to bring a list of questions with you, as well as a friend or family member to ask questions you may not have identified.

R – Repeat what your doctor recommends so you can be sure you understand. Ask for written instructions.

T – Take action. Inform your doctor of your lifestyle and habits, as well as any concerns and preferences, so a treatment plan can be customized to your specific needs.

“Patients who track their symptoms are better prepared to communicate effectively with their doctors,” said Dr. John Klippel, CEO of the Arthritis Foundation. “Accurate information helps both parties work together to determine the best possible treatment options.”

Fostering open communication with one’s doctor is particularly important for patients with hard-to-diagnose diseases like the autoimmune disorder rheumatoid arthritis (RA), as symptoms can be attributed to other medical conditions. Furthermore, there is no single diagnostic test for RA.

There are programs that help patients and doctors work together to manage health conditions by communicating openly. The Arthritis Foundation’s Let’s Talk RA program, sponsored by Bristol-Myers Squibb, offers national meetings, educational podcasts and a communication kit that includes step-by-step discussion tips, as well as a symptom tracker that RA patients can use with their rheumatologists -; all at no cost.

The Let’s Talk RA communication kit can be ordered at no charge through the Arthritis Foundation’s Web site, www.arthritis.org/letstalkra or by calling 1-800-283-7800.

Epilepsy Tragedies Stir Reform for Emergency Personnel

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – A man tried to break into his neighbor’s home. When police officers arrived, he approached them, ignoring their commands to stop. The police used tasers, pepper spray and batons to wrestle the man to the ground, face down, then handcuff him behind his back. And while using physical force is the norm for an uncooperative suspect’s arrest, appearances do deceive.

The man, James Edward Wells, had just experienced a tonic-clonic seizure. In his post-seizure confusion, he mistook his neighbor’s house for his own and could not understand the officers’ orders. Shortly after the cops pinned him face down, Wells stopped breathing. This misunderstanding is cause for concern for the nearly 3 million Americans living with epilepsy, a neurological condition characterized by seizures, or electrical disturbances in the brain. During seizures, people with epilepsy may lose control of their actions or words, be unable to respond to other people and display odd behaviors, like sudden crying, falling, running, screaming, shouting or mumbling.

According to the Epilepsy Foundation, there is an increase in the number of reports of people having seizures or experiencing post-seizure confusion and being injured by first responders — law enforcement or emergency medical services (EMS) teams.

For this reason, The Epilepsy Foundation developed First Responders Training curricula to educate law enforcement and EMS teams on how to recognize and respond to persons experiencing seizures.

The Foundation also suggests that people with epilepsy take the following steps to help EMS teams respond appropriately:

* Wear medical alert identification at all times.

* Always carry a seizure first-aid card.

* Keep a list of your medications and allergies with you.

* Carry the names and contact information of your primary care physicians or neurologists.

* Tell family members or friends to inform EMS personnel that you have epilepsy should they have to call for help on your behalf.

For more information, visit www.epilepsyfoundation.org.

MLK’s ‘Dream’ to Shine in Four-Acre Memorial

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – During the 1963 March on Washington, Martin Luther King, Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial and delivered what would become his most famous public words. King’s “I Have a Dream” speech left an indelible imprint on hundreds of thousands of civil rights demonstrators that day and would continue to do so for generations to come. Now, more than 45 years after King’s inspirational words rang through the crowd of more than 200,000 people, plans for King’s legacy to be immortalized in a large-scale memorial are fast becoming a reality.

In early 2008, construction will commence at the site of the the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial, a four-acre plot located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. For the past 10 years, the Washington, DC Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project Foundation has led this historic effort, taking the helm after it was conceived more than two decades ago. Throughout this time span, the Foundation has remained committed to King’s legacy, virtues and humanity for all people -; regardless of race, color or creed.

“This year we will see the culmination of a decade’s worth of work,” said Harry E. Johnson, Sr., president and CEO of the MLK National Memorial Project Foundation. “We enthusiastically anticipate reaching a number of key milestones that will bring the national MLK Memorial one step closer to taking its permanent residence on the National Mall in our nation’s capital.”

The MLK Memorial will be situated adjacent to the FDR Memorial, directly between the Lincoln and Jefferson Memorials. The centerpiece of the MLK Memorial is the “Stone of Hope,” a three-story statue of King that emerges from a stone wall of granite. A grove of cherry trees will also encompass the landmark to underscore themes of justice, love and hope.

“To date, we have raised nearly $90 million for the MLK National Memorial Project -; but we are still working tirelessly to meet the $100-million goal required to actually build and maintain the memorial,” Johnson said.

For more information on the Washington, DC Martin Luther King, Jr. National Memorial Project, or to find out how to contribute, visit www.BuildtheDream.org or call 1-888-4-THE-DREAM.