Physical Activity Increases Loss of Essential Mineral

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Most adults know that daily cardio is great for burning fat and reducing stress, but you may not know that a rise in sweat output can cause an increase in your loss of essential minerals, such as magnesium.*
People drink water after they exercise to rehydrate, but individuals need to replenish more than just H2O. Mineral loss through the excretion of sweat and urine is increased during prolonged exercise. Due to how much they sweat, it’s crucial for endurance athletes with low magnesium intakes to replenish their magnesium levels.*
Endurance athletes sweat at a rate of one to one-and-a-half liters per hour. They also have greater risk for magnesium imbalance because of a high excretion rate and the length of their training sessions. For example, in 70 degree weather, the average loss of magnesium via sweat during a 40 minute-run is over seven milligrams.*
Magnesium is necessary for many different reasons, especially energy and endurance needs. It activates enzymes known as ATPases, which are needed to transfer and release energy for muscle contractions.* During exercise, adequate levels of magnesium, maintained by a healthy diet and a daily supplement such as Slow-Mag Tablets, can really come in handy.
This process is what produces the energy source needed to exercise efficiently. Low levels of magnesium may be associated with limited energy efficiency, reduced metabolic efficiency and increased oxygen consumption and heart rate during aerobic activity.*
Studies have shown a relationship between sweat magnesium loss and muscle cramps.* An astounding 7 out of 10 Americans don’t get enough magnesium from their diet. The amount of magnesium you need each day is based on your age, sex and other factors.*
Since magnesium functions in many processes necessary for exercise performance, it is important for athletes to have adequate magnesium levels. To help figure out if you’re meeting the daily requirement, use the magnesium calculator at www.slowmag.com.
How much magnesium are you getting each day? Learn how you can supplement what you’re missing. Plus, there are articles and videos on why magnesium is necessary and how to get more of it–all available online.

Keep Gnats From Becoming A Pain in the Neck

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – It’s home run time. From spring training through the World Series in October, baseball fans are glued to their flat screens.
Vascular surgeon David H. Stone, M.D., encourages arm chair enthusiasts to get into the game. “Find your favorite summertime sports pastime, and give your vascular system a great workout.”
As a member of the Society for Vascular Surgery, Dr. Stone encourages physical activity that can pump up blood while lowering blood pressure. “More than diet, exercise helps keep your weight down and provides positive health benefits,” said Dr. Stone.
After a one-hour workout, the Mayo Clinic states that a 200-pound person will have burned the following calories:
* Baseball — 455
* Bicycling, 10 mph — 364
* Golfing, carrying clubs — 391
* Rope jumping — 1,074
* Swimming laps — 528
* Tennis, singles — 728

Is Your Dog the Worst Behaved Dog in America?

Is your dog bad to the bone? Does your sweet Jack Russel guard all doors from intruders – friends and family included? Or is it your Boxer puppy that won’t stop shredding socks and underwear? Some of the cutest pooches have the worst manners. Whether you’re at work or just in another room, their mischievous play may lead to anything from home repairs to staggering vet bills.

Pets and owners alike can relate to this common problem, but getting the magical, behavioral transformation you’ve always dreamt of is closer than you think.

How to Fight Winter Morning’s Chill

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – As winter’s chill sets in, getting out of bed may turn into a daily challenge. But there are ways to put some pep in your morning step.
Morning can be an enjoyable time to collect yourself and prepare for the day. The following tips will help jumpstart your day.
* Open up your shades as the sun rises. If getting up early is difficult, getting up before the sun rises is downright painful — but winter doesn’t leave you much choice. As soon as the sun pops above the horizon, throw open your curtains and expose yourself to sunlight. Just like darkness encourages the body to relax and fall asleep, light is a natural cue for the brain to wake up. Sunlight stops your brain from producing melatonin, the sleep hormone.
* Get your heart pumping with some morning exercise. Exercise releases endorphins and other mood-enhancing chemicals like serotonin and dopamine. This means you’ll start the day full of energy and without anxiety. Plus, you’ll be burning fat and boosting your immune system by producing more proteins.
* Run your clothes through the dryer for five minutes before getting dressed. Put your outfit in the dryer right before you jump in the shower so it’ll be warm and fresh as soon as you need it. This will ward off the winter chill while also helping you look forward to getting dressed. To give yourself a few extra minutes, pick out an outfit the night before. Any decision can seem daunting before 7 a.m.
* Recharge with a hot bowl of oatmeal. Oatmeal can be a delicious and nutritious way to fuel up post-workout. Better Oats (www.betteroats.com) uses only whole-grain oats, real fruit and real chocolate, and it also has flax seeds full of omega-3, fiber and vitamins A and E. Oatmeal is a great source of nutrition for those cold winter mornings.
For more information, visit www.betteroats.com.

Boomers: Don’t Take Old Age Laying Down

Many aging baby boomers expect to exercise well into their seventies, and most plan to live independently for as long as possible. Luckily, companies are designing products that help boomers retain their active lifestyles.

To help consumers find products that are easy to use at any age, the Arthritis Foundation developed its Ease of Use program, which employs testers with moderate-to-severe arthritis to evaluate products. The Arthritis Foundation provides the following tips for boomers unwilling to let age interfere with their favorite activities:

Tips to Overcome the Barriers Keeping You from Exercising

As sunny weather beckons, many Americans dust off their jump ropes, soccer balls and sports equipment. Some prepare for the beach. On the other hand, many others are inactive. If you are one of those who struggle to fit in exercise, know that you can find ways to overcome your barriers to better health.

The Weight-control Information Network (WIN), an information service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), offers tips for overcoming the following barriers:

Overcome Your Exercise Barriers

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – As sunny weather beckons, many Americans dust off their jump ropes, soccer balls and sports equipment. Some prepare for the beach. On the other hand, many others are inactive. If you are one of those who struggle to fit in exercise, know that you can find ways to overcome your barriers to better health.

The Weight-control Information Network (WIN), an information service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH), offers tips for overcoming the following barriers:

“I am too busy.” No matter how busy you are, you can find ways to fit activity into your daily life. For example, designate one part of each day for physical activity. You can also schedule exercise in short bouts, such as taking 15-minute walks in the morning, at lunch, in the afternoon and after dinner.

Try performing active chores. Examples include gardening, washing cars, mowing grass and vacuuming. You can also get your family involved by taking family walks around your neighborhood and visiting community parks and recreation centers on weekends.

“I am too tired.” At the end of a long day, doing anything but vegging in front of the television might seem downright Herculean. But here’s a secret: exercise gives you more energy. Going for a jog or brisk walk might help you feel less tired. Exercise also reduces stress, so a gentle walk can help you unwind after work. Finally, make exercise fun! If jogging on a treadmill sounds like torture, turn on your radio or portable music device and dance to your favorite song.

“I don’t like physical activity.” How many times have you said that you just don’t like exercise? To bring more joy to physical activity, ask a friend to be your exercise buddy — you can motivate each other and socialize at the same time. Also, choose an activity that you like, such as walking. You are more likely to stick with it. You can visit with a friend or take in the scenery as you walk.

For more information, call WIN at 1-877-946-4627 or visit www.win.niddk.nih.gov and read the free brochure, “Tips to Help You Get Active.”

Boomers Refuse to Take Old Age Laying Down

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Many baby boomers expect to exercise well into their seventies, and most plan to live independently for as long as possible. Luckily, companies are designing products that help boomers retain their active lifestyles.

To help consumers find products that are easy to use at any age, the Arthritis Foundation developed its Ease of Use program, which employs testers with moderate-to-severe arthritis to evaluate products. The Arthritis Foundation provides the following tips for boomers unwilling to let age interfere with their favorite activities:

* Choose exercise equipment that reduces strain on joints. Baby boomers love their exercise, so it can be frustrating when knees, hips and backs protest after running or cycling. But there’s no reason that boomers can’t make adjustments that allow them to continue their favorite activities.

For example, gym rats can find indoor exercise equipment specifically designed to avoid straining hips, knees and shoulders. The NuStep 4000 Recumbent Cross Trainer received the Arthritis Foundation’s Ease-of-Use Commendation for its comfortable seat and ability to provide an effective upper- and lower-body workout without stressing joints.

* Make bathroom cleaning more accessible. Cleaning the bathroom can often be an arduous task. Bending and scrubbing can add unwanted pressure to joints and muscles. Products like Scrubbing Bubbles, an SC Johnson cleaning product, has incorporated innovative ways to ease unnecessary work from the necessary evil of cleaning the bathroom. Scrubbing Bubbles’ Automatic Shower Cleaner is a breakthrough cleaning system that automatically sprays cleaner to eliminate the buildup of tough soap scum and mold and mildew stains. The cleaning formula combines with the water on your shower walls to begin working immediately.

* Eliminate bending and kneeling. As you age, climbing on chairs to reach tall shelves or stooping to fish through low cabinets becomes less feasible. Designing your home to put your possessions in reach can help you stay independent as you age.

When purchasing cabinets or other storage spaces, look for features like adjustable shelving, pullouts and extensions. For example, The Diamond Logix 36 Inch SuperCabinet with Rollouts and Pullouts has three roll-out trays, dual storage and two wire pull-out baskets, so you don’t have to reach, kneel or bend to access items.

For more information, visit www.arthritis.org.

Weekend Warriors: Don’t Become Weekend Wounded

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – You enjoyed your long run Saturday, but it’s been four days, and you still feel sore and tired. As the saying goes, there’s no gain without pain, so you should still fit in a workout, right?

Well, no. No matter your sport, chronic fatigue and soreness are signs that your body needs a break. When you exercise, you break down muscle tissue, which can only rebuild with downtime. Sore muscles are muscles that haven’t rested enough to recover — pushing through the pain increases the risk of injury.

Instead of forcing your body to perform, do everything possible to help your muscles recover. The faster you recover, the more miles, laps, rounds and innings you’ll be able to complete. Here are some tips that can help you improve your recovery time after workouts:

* Pay attention to what and when you’re eating. You can’t fuel workouts without, well, food. Carbohydrates are the body’s primary source of energy, so it’s important to consume them prior to and, in some cases, during, exercise. After exercise, you need to consume easily digested carbohydrates to restore your muscles’ glycogen levels and a protein to jump-start repair. You don’t need expensive protein powders or bars — a fruit smoothie made with milk or yogurt will accomplish just as much as a supplement. And don’t forget to drink water before, during and after exercise.

* Have a sports massage. Massage increases circulation, which helps muscles recover faster. A short, stimulating massage before an event may improve performance, while a massage within an hour of a workout can help normalize body tissues. Restorative sports massages help prevent injuries during training, and rehabilitative sports massage can relieve pain if injuries occur. Athletes in training should aim to get a sports massage at least once a month. Look for massage franchises, such as Massage Envy (www.massageenvy.com), which can offer affordable pricing and convenient locations.

* Take a break. It’s okay to push yourself — that’s how you improve. But the greater the frequency and intensity of your exercise, the more likely you are to sustain serious injury. Take care to structure rest days into your exercise schedule, and don’t increase your exercise by more that 10 percent a week. Try too much too soon, and you can find yourself sidelined for months.

Put “Brain Power” on the Back-to-School List

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<p>(<a   href=NewsUSA) – That groan you hear is most likely the collective sound of children’s disappointment that summer is almost over and a new school year is about to begin. And while you’ve probably thought of all the back-to-school essentials, there’s something you might not have considered — brain health.

Based on considerable research indicating that diet, exercise and rest can help improve cognitive performance, the California Innovations BrainFuel program helps parents lay a strong foundation for their children’s education. It features short articles that highlight recent brain research, the impact that sleep and fitness have on mental acuity, quick tips for packing smarter lunches, and recipes for brain-healthy meals. Here are a few tips to get you started:

* Skip the snooze and make breakfast. Research has found that breakfast-eaters have higher school attendance, reduced tardiness, better behavior, and stronger test performance than breakfast-skippers.

* Drop the pop. Is soda pop really that bad? “Yup. Affirmative. Absolutely,” says board-certified nutritionist and author Jonny Bowden, PhD, CNS. Loaded with high-fructose corn syrup, soda pop offers a lot of calories and no nutritional value. Stick with the basics — 100 percent juice, milk, or plain old water.

* Go nuts! For snacks, skip the potato chips and pack nuts instead (allergies aside, of course). Walnuts are high in Omega-3 and antioxidants like vitamin E and vitamin B6.

* Focus on fitness. Experts aren’t exactly sure how exercise fuels learning, but they know that it does. According to Dr. John J. Ratey, clinical associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School, “Exercise itself doesn’t make you smarter, but it puts the brain of the learners in the optimal position for them to learn.” Studies show that exercise enables cells to sprout synapses, which are crucial to forming connections the brain needs in order to learn.

* Encourage plenty of sleep. “Even minor changes in sleep… can impair a school kid’s learning, memory, attention [and] concentration,” says researcher Avi Sadeh, DSc, director of the Laboratory for Children’s Sleep and Arousal Disorders at Tel Aviv University.

The California Innovations BrainFuel program is made possible with support from LeapFrog, Horizon, Every Day with Rachael Ray, Bumble Bee, Dole Fruit Bowls, Parents Magazine and other sponsors. Get additional tips, learn more, and register for the $30,000 Sweepstakes at www.brainfuel4kids.com.