Public Safety and Business Security Turn to HD Technology

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Although cities are vibrant centers of culture and business, city dwellers must deal with public safety issues like theft, assault and vandalism. When law enforcement is stretched thin, who is held accountable for such crime, and how can individuals and businesses tighten security?
When a theft at his former business remained unsolved despite a significant investment in surveillance equipment, business owner Alexander Fernandes had a vision — build the world’s best surveillance systems based on emerging high-definition (HD) technology.
“Low-quality surveillance footage simply isn’t cutting it anymore. If the image is fuzzy and grainy, what kind of evidence is it? What kind of deterrent is it?” asks Fernandes, now the co-founder and CEO of Avigilon, a global supplier of HD video surveillance solutions. “Businesses, governments and other organizations need quality images that can be used to provide usable evidence in order to promote public safety, manage liability and ultimately detect and deter crimes.”
High-definition images can provide irrefutable evidence, which is revolutionizing security-monitoring systems for public transportation, government organizations and businesses on a global scale.
Despite the availability of higher-quality HD solutions most installed surveillance systems still use analog technology, which results in grainy footage because of low-resolution cameras and poor-quality recording equipment. The perceived higher cost of HD is a reason why some organizations are not jumping to upgrade. Buyers won’t, or can’t, pay a premium for better technology. Related is the fact that new HD components must be compatible with existing analog surveillance equipment and IT infrastructure.
Avigilon has responded to the demand and barriers of adopting HD surveillance by architecting a complete system that delivers the best image detail, yet also eases the burden of cost, installation and support. To-date, Avigilon systems have been installed in more than 80 countries as organizations recognize the advantages of HD technology.
“We can cover 50,000 spectators in a stadium with 10 of our cameras and get facial recognition and valid, usable evidence,” says Fernandes. “It could literally take over a thousand analog cameras to get that extreme detail.”
Many other valuable non-security uses for HD surveillance are also emerging, such as analyzing traffic flow and staffing productivity.
Learn more about using HD digital surveillance systems to protect and enhance your business or community by visiting www.avigilon.com.

What Is Wrong With Our Justice System?

Despite enormous interest in the outcome of the Casey Anthony trial, more questions have emerged than answers. The truth is that the criminal justice system remains a vast enigma to the majority of the population.

Popular television programs have led juries and the public to expect hard evidence including fingerprints, DNA analysis and other forensic evidence clearly pointing to perpetrators, but the facts are seldom so clear-cut.

According to Greg Little, an experienced psychologist who specializes in criminal treatment, the main problem is that there are so many crimes occurring and the system is clogged with huge numbers of offenders. There is no way that the system can do what the public now expects on each case,

Clogged Justice System Leads to Recidivism

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Despite enormous interest in the outcome of the Casey Anthony trial, more questions have emerged than answers. The truth is that the criminal justice system remains a vast enigma to the majority of the population.
Popular television programs have led juries and the public to expect hard evidence including fingerprints, DNA analysis and other forensic evidence clearly pointing to perpetrators, but the facts are seldom so clear-cut.
“One problem is that there are so many crimes in the U.S. today that the system is clogged with huge numbers of offenders,” explains Greg Little, an experienced psychologist who specializes in criminal treatment.
“There is no way that the system can do what the public now expects on each case,” Little says. Along with his colleagues, Little has issued a new textbook on the way the justice system treats offenders. Most offenders are diagnosable with a criminal personality, known as antisocial personality disorder (ASPD).
“ASPD is the professional term for psychopath or sociopath,” Little explains. “About 4 percent of the adult population has the disorder, with adult men showing a rate of nearly 6 percent.”
The disorder has a severity scale with a wide range of behavior. The less severe ones lie, cheat and take advantage; the most severe are violent and resort to murder. If you look out your front door and see five other houses, chances are that there is a psychopath living in at least one house.
In Little’s book “Antisocial Personality Disorder and Criminal Justice,” the extent of the problem in America is made clear. Nearly 15 million arrests are made in America each year, but jails house only 800,000 individuals awaiting trial.
Prisons hold another 1.5 million people, but 5 million other convicted criminals are living in the community under parole or probation. Within three years, about 40 percent of probationers will be arrested again. After release from prison, an astonishing 67 percent will be rearrested.
According to Little and colleagues, society should not give up on offenders, nor should it be discouraged by the way the justice system handles crime.
For more information, check out www.ccimrt.com.