De-Junk Before Spring Cleaning

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – A refreshing swim can help lower blood pressure and cholesterol. These are vascular health bonuses for people who are at risk for stroke, the leading cause of disability and the fourth leading cause of death in the United States.
In 2010, 137,000 Americans died of stroke, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
“Swimming is a vascular health bonanza,” said David H. Stone, MD, and a member of the Society for Vascular Surgery. “Low-impact swimming provides a total cardiovascular workout. Regular exercise strengthens the heart muscle, resulting in less effort and a decrease in blood pressure.”
One in every three Americans over 20 years old — 74 million Americans — has high blood pressure according to 2010 statistics from the CDC. One in every six American adults has high cholesterol (more than 250 mg/d L). More American women than men have high cholesterol.
To reduce high cholesterol levels, exercise and diet are important factors. The American Council on Exercise suggests that adults burn 2000 calories a week from exercise.
The lack of regular physical activity results in 250,000 deaths annually, according to a 2003 report in the journal Circulation.
As long as the exercise regimen continues, the health benefits remain.
After 12 to 14 weeks of a three- to five-days-a-week exercise regimen of 20 to 60 minutes at an intensity of 60 to 90 percent heart rate, bad (LDL) cholesterol can decrease by up to 20 percent according to Livestrong.com. Another bonus: aerobic exercise can increase good (HDL) cholesterol.
In a 2010 University of Western Australia study, 100 women swimmers, ages 50 to 70, lowered their bad cholesterol and lost more inches in the waist and hips than walkers. Likewise, swimming is easy on the joints and doesn’t result in overheating.
There are non-invasive screening tests that can detect vascular disease. Medication can treat vascular disease. For free print and electronic vascular health information, visit VascularWeb.org.

Salga de la oscuridad con exámenes oculares regulares

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – More than one in three seniors over age 65 fall each year, and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) says 80 percent of these falls are in the bathroom. Due to the multitude of unforgiving and slippery surfaces, bathrooms are very hazardous for the home.
Knowing how to get in and out of tubs and showers properly and equipping homes with necessary safety precautions can reduce senior falls, keep them out of the emergency room and possibly extend their life.
According to research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 million older adults seek emergency care each year for fall-related injuries, fractures or head trauma. In addition to potentially losing their independence, seniors 65 years old and up have a 25 percent chance of dying within six months to a year if they fall and break a hip.
Seniors are vulnerable to falls for many reasons — eyesight and reflexes aren’t as razor-sharp as they used to be, not to mention the balance issues posed by diabetes, heart disease, thyroid conditions and various medications.
One of the most effective ways to preserve balance is to stay active with an exercise regimen. Ask your doctor about exercises designed to improve balance, stability and overall mobility, such as moderate yoga.
But, another preventative method recommended by physicians is installing a shower or tub built around the unique needs of elderly adults. For example, Safe Step Tub Walk-In Tub Company’s new walk-in shower has a foldable chair, flexible shower wand, grab bars, ultra-low step up and other senior-friendly features. And since the cost of retirement is high for many seniors, installation is included in the price.
To find out more about these showers and walk-in tubs or to request a free brochure and DVD, visit www.safesteptub.com/news
Besides a customized shower or bath, NIA and the American Geriatrics Society advise the following bathroom safety precautions for seniors:
* Non-slip rubber mats in front of sink, toilet and shower/bath.
* Grab bars inside and outside of shower/bath and on either side of the toilet (these are much stronger than towel racks, which aren’t meant to support weight).
* Bright lights that are easily accessible.

Grandparents, Grandkids Benefit From Better Hearing

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – More than one in three seniors over age 65 fall each year, and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) says 80 percent of these falls are in the bathroom. Due to the multitude of unforgiving and slippery surfaces, bathrooms are very hazardous for the home.
Knowing how to get in and out of tubs and showers properly and equipping homes with necessary safety precautions can reduce senior falls, keep them out of the emergency room and possibly extend their life.
According to research from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1.6 million older adults seek emergency care each year for fall-related injuries, fractures or head trauma. In addition to potentially losing their independence, seniors 65 years old and up have a 25 percent chance of dying within six months to a year if they fall and break a hip.
Seniors are vulnerable to falls for many reasons — eyesight and reflexes aren’t as razor-sharp as they used to be, not to mention the balance issues posed by diabetes, heart disease, thyroid conditions and various medications.
One of the most effective ways to preserve balance is to stay active with an exercise regimen. Ask your doctor about exercises designed to improve balance, stability and overall mobility, such as moderate yoga.
But, another preventative method recommended by physicians is installing a shower or tub built around the unique needs of elderly adults. For example, Safe Step Tub Walk-In Tub Company’s new walk-in shower has a foldable chair, flexible shower wand, grab bars, ultra-low step up and other senior-friendly features. And since the cost of retirement is high for many seniors, installation is included in the price.
To find out more about these showers and walk-in tubs or to request a free brochure and DVD, visit www.safesteptub.com/news
Besides a customized shower or bath, NIA and the American Geriatrics Society advise the following bathroom safety precautions for seniors:
* Non-slip rubber mats in front of sink, toilet and shower/bath.
* Grab bars inside and outside of shower/bath and on either side of the toilet (these are much stronger than towel racks, which aren’t meant to support weight).
* Bright lights that are easily accessible.

Keep Gnats From Becoming A Pain in the Neck

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – It’s home run time. From spring training through the World Series in October, baseball fans are glued to their flat screens.
Vascular surgeon David H. Stone, M.D., encourages arm chair enthusiasts to get into the game. “Find your favorite summertime sports pastime, and give your vascular system a great workout.”
As a member of the Society for Vascular Surgery, Dr. Stone encourages physical activity that can pump up blood while lowering blood pressure. “More than diet, exercise helps keep your weight down and provides positive health benefits,” said Dr. Stone.
After a one-hour workout, the Mayo Clinic states that a 200-pound person will have burned the following calories:
* Baseball — 455
* Bicycling, 10 mph — 364
* Golfing, carrying clubs — 391
* Rope jumping — 1,074
* Swimming laps — 528
* Tennis, singles — 728

Increase Your Mussel Power in 2012

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Latinos in the U.S. have a longer life expectancy than the non-Latino white population.
Given lower average income and access to health care among Latinos, epidemiologists have proposed various theories to explain this puzzling statistic, dubbed the “Latino Paradox.”
A 2011 study in the American Journal of Epidemiology found the low mortality rates were partially attributable to fewer deaths from cigarette smoking — Latinos are less likely to smoke, and if they do, they tend to smoke less.
Another popular theory points to healthy aspects of Latino culture, including the Latin Diet. In “The Hot Latin Diet,” author Dr. Manny Alvarez says Latin cooking typically includes healthy “power” foods like tomatillos, cilantro and chili peppers.
The capsaicin in chili peppers reduces inflammation. Inflammation aggravates common ailments like headaches and arthritis and has been associated with the development of deadly cancers and heart disease.
“For fabulous flavors and good health, we recommend using the Latin American Diet Pyramid. Let traditional foods — the old ways of your grandmother — be your guide to well being,” said Sara Baer-Sinnott, president of Oldways, a non-profit organization promoting healthy eating habits and creator of the Latin American Diet Pyramid.
There are many new products that make cooking healthy Latin food easier. Chef LaLa, a cookbook author and certified nutritionist, has just launched her new line of all-natural Mexican sauces and marinades.
“Chef LaLa Homemade products are all about easy meal solutions with the healthy natural flavors and ingredients of the traditional Latin Diet,” says Chef LaLa.
Get a taste of the nutritional power of Latin cuisine — and chili peppers — with this recipe from www.cheflala.com:

Tips for Independent Living After 70

(NewsUSA) – One out of every 20 Americans over age 50 is diagnosed with Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). The worst part of this reality is that most people with PAD don’t experience any symptoms. PAD is dangerous, especially when there are no warning signs.Peripheral Arterial Disease is a progressive disease commonly called clogged arteries in the legs, poor circulation or a hardening of the arteries.People have PAD when the arteries in their legs become narrowed or clogged with fatty deposits, or plaque. The buildup of plaque causes the arteries to harden and narrow, which is called atherosclerosis. This reduces blood flow to the legs and feet.The severity of the disease depends on how early it’s diagnosed as well as pre-existing health issues. PAD’s primary symptom is an intermittent cramping of leg muscles during walks or hikes. For some, the pain may feel more like numbness, weakness or heaviness. Whether or not you have symptoms, having PAD means that you’re at a higher risk for heart attack, stroke and even death.Many people don’t get tested for PAD because they have no symptoms and never feel a thing. The good news is that proper treatment saves lives. If you’re over 50, talk to your health care provider about getting tested for PAD.The test for PAD is called the "ABI" or ankle-brachial index. It’s a comparison of blood pressure measurements taken at the arms and ankles. It can also assess the severity of the disease.Despite the presence or lack of symptoms, individuals are their own first line of defense. When face time with actual doctors is limited, it’s helpful to have a list of prepared questions on hand.The Vascular Disease Foundation (VDF), a non-profit dedicated to public awareness and education regarding vascular health, has compiled some questions to ask doctors about PAD:* Does my medical history raise my risk for PAD?* What can I do to reduce my blood sugar level if it’s too high or if I have diabetes?* What do you recommend to quit smoking?For more information, or to get a free Heart and Sole kit, go to www.vdf.org or 1-866-PADINFO (1-866-723-4636).

Family Caregivers Month Highlights Parkinson’s Disease

(NewsUSA) – For the fifteenth year, November has been declared National Family Caregivers Month. Parkinson’s disease (PD), which inhibits motor skill function and cognitive ability, affects not only the person diagnosed but also family and friends around them. Carolyn manages her PD with proper treatment, exercise and support from her husband and caregiver of 51 years, Joe.In his caregiver role, Joe says, "From day one, I had to accept the hand we were dealt and do what I could to ensure that Carolyn remained active and continued taking her medication as directed."After experiencing a slight tremor in her right thumb and persistent handwriting abnormalities for five years, Carolyn and Joe visited a neurologist who diagnosed her PD and prescribed AZILECT® (rasagiline tablets) and regular exercise to help manage her disease.While symptoms and treatment may vary among patients, Carolyn finds that having her husband, Joe, as a dedicated caregiver makes life easier. When asked his most important piece of advice for fellow caregivers, Joe replied, "Long-term planning for medical and financial security is essential." Additionally, he cites patience and understanding as two virtues that all caregivers must display.With Joe’s care and her daily treatment, Carolyn has been able to continue enjoying the things she loves, like spending time with her grandchildren, traveling and enjoying water sports at a nearby lake.For more information about PD, please visit www.parkinsonshealth.com.  IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT AZILECT Patients should not take AZILECT if they are taking meperidine as it could result in a serious reaction such as coma or death. Also, patients should not take AZILECT with tramadol, methadone, propoxyphene, dextromethorphan, St. John’s wort, or cyclobenzaprine. Patients also should not take AZILECT with other monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Patients should inform their physician if they are taking, or planning to take, any prescription or over-the-counter drugs, especially antidepressants and ciprofloxacin. If patients have moderate to severe liver disease, they should not take AZILECT. Patients should not exceed a dose of 1 mg per day of AZILECT in order to prevent a possibly dangerous increase in blood pressure. All PD patients should be monitored for melanoma (skin cancer) on a regular basis. Side effects seen with AZILECT alone are flu syndrome, joint pain, depression, and indigestion; and when taken with levodopa are uncontrolled movements (dyskinesia), accidental injury, weight loss, low blood pressure when standing, vomiting, anorexia, joint pain, abdominal pain, nausea, constipation, dry mouth, rash, abnormal dreams, and fall. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088. See additional important information at http://azilect.com/Resources/PDFs/PrescribingInformation-pdf.aspx, or call 1-877-4-AZILECT.

Take the Bite out of Pesky Mosquitoes

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Mosquitoes are breeding by the billions, and they are more than a minor outdoor nuisance. These blood-suckers can spread diseases such as West Nile virus, encephalitis, dengue fever and malaria. In the United States, West Nile virus is of most concern, which is why most municipalities monitor and sample mosquitoes and treat known mosquito breeding areas.
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the U.S. documented 1,021 cases of West Nile Virus in 2010, of which 57 resulted in death.
Because of the ease with which mosquitoes can breed and spread disease, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) reminds homeowners to be vigilant about mosquito prevention, especially as excessive rain and flooding experienced by much of the country in recent weeks provides perfect breeding grounds for mosquitoes.
Many people may not be aware that mosquito season does not end when summer does, but actually lasts through October. The NPMA recommends the following preventive measures to safeguard you against mosquitoes:
* Prevent mosquito nesting and breeding sites by eliminating standing water and other sources of moisture in and around the home in flowerpots, water dishes, birdbaths, swimming pool covers, baby pools, sandboxes, children’s toys and other objects that can collect water. Mosquitoes need only about 1/2 inch of water to breed. To keep birdbath and pond water fresh, homeowners should add a fountain or drip system.
* Keep windows and doors properly screened. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.
* Clean clogged gutters, and periodically check them to ensure water is flowing freely.
* Ensure there is no standing water pooling under decks.
* Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active.
* If you must spend time outdoors during peak mosquito times, avoid wearing shorts or short-sleeved apparel, dark colors, loose-fitting garments, open-toe shoes and sweet-smelling perfumes or colognes. Instead, wear long pants and sleeves, and be sure to use an insect repellant containing DEET.
* If you are concerned about mosquito activity on your property, contact a pest management company or local mosquito abatement district that may be able to treat your back yard, specifically trees and shrubs where mosquitoes hide during the day.
For more information, visit www.pestworld.org.

Patients Helping Patients With Kidney Disease

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, approximately one out of every six adults in the United States is living with chronic kidney disease (CKD). If you are battling this disease or caring for someone who has it, help and support are just a phone call away. The Renal Support Network (RSN) offers a unique program called the RSN HOPEline, a patient-run, toll-free telephone service that specializes in patient-to-patient support for people diagnosed with CKD and those who care for them.
Callers gain valuable insights from speaking to someone who understands — a knowledgeable patient who has learned to live successfully with the illness. RSN HOPEline operators share their experiences and impart strength and hope. RSN is a nonprofit, patient-focused, patient-run organization that provides non-medical services to those affected by CKD.
For more information, visit RSNhope.org or call RSN HOPEline at 1-800-579-1970 (English) or 1-800-780-4238 (Spanish).

Protect Your Heart Through Your Legs

One out of every 20 Americans over age 50 is diagnosed with Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD). The worst part of this reality is that most people with PAD don’t experience any symptoms. PAD is dangerous, especially when there are no warning signs.

Peripheral Arterial Disease is a progressive disease commonly called clogged arteries in the legs, poor circulation or a hardening of the arteries.

People have PAD when the arteries in their legs become narrowed or clogged with fatty deposits, or plaque. The buildup of plaque causes the arteries to harden and narrow, which is called atherosclerosis. This reduces blood flow to the legs and feet. Its severity depends on how early the disease is diagnosed as well as pre-existing health issues.