Litter Box Tips to Prevent Urinary Tract Problems Among Cats

Urinary tract problems are a common affliction among cats. Regular litter box cleaning is an important step in keeping this painful condition in check.

“Cleanliness is one key to avoiding cat urinary tract problems,” says veterinarian Melissa Brookshire. “Urinary tract obstructions, evidenced by straining without producing any urine, are emergency situations that require immediate veterinary attention. Once diagnosed and treated, steps for prevention should become routine. Having a fresh, clean litter box can go a long way in preventing this affliction.”

Check out the following advice for hassle-free cat care and litter box help:

How Do You Define "Natural"?

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – It’s safe to say neither cats nor dogs give one whisker about whether the products they use are eco-friendly. Yet more pet owners do — and the pet industry is responding.
The exploding popularity of sustainable living has manifested itself in an increasing number of products being marketed as eco-friendly options for earth-conscious owners of all types of pets. Walk down the aisle of your local grocery store, and you’ll see countless bags and boxes whose now-leafy labels boast “green,” “natural,” or “organic” claims.
However, the definition of “green” remains the subject of much debate. Look no further then cat litter for an example of how the “natural” line is blurred: Clay — the main ingredient in a large majority of litters — is often touted as being “natural,” but it requires strip-mining and can contain silica dust that carries the potential of damaging the lungs of people and pets. In fact, most cat litters are made out of minerals that can technically be described as “natural,” but that doesn’t necessarily mean they are sustainable, biodegradable or healthy if ingested or inhaled.
The question you must ask yourself, as a pet owner, is whether the products you choose actually live up to their eco-friendly billing or whether they are using “green-washing” — a term used to describe how companies use marketing gimmicks to make their product only seem more natural.
One company, World’s Best Cat Litter, urges customers to scrutinize labels to make sure that you’re getting the type of natural products you demand. They define “natural” as products made of naturally occurring ingredients that are biodegradable, healthy, safe and derived from renewable resources. World’s Best Cat Litter uses the power of natural, whole-kernel corn to stop odor in its tracks. It’s grown and is digestible, dust-free and lacking any chemical additives.
Reinforcing their commitment to high standards, in addition to the original Clumping and Multiple Cat Clumping Formulas, World’s Best Cat Litter has also launched a truly “natural” scented formula providing consumers who prefer a scented litter with an all-natural lavender oil option — once again proving you don’t have to sacrifice the planet to meet consumer demands.
For more information, visit www.worldsbestcatlitter.com.

Minimize Pet Stress With These Helpful Moving Tips

Moving with pets? You’re not alone. According to a recent study by the American Pet Products Association, 11 million families move with their pets annually. So how do you keep Fluffy happy when prepping for a new move? Easy: plan ahead.

While exotic pets require extra-special attention during moves, Penske Truck Rental is focusing on dogs and cats – the most common furry friends among Americans. Their experts and the Humane Society recommend the following additional tips to help pet owners and their four-legged friends have a safe, comfortable and stress-free move.

Before the Move:

Is Your Cat’s Bad Breath Saying Something?

How many times has your cat come to wake you up by rubbing his face against your face in the morning? Your cat looks adorable, but the odor coming from his mouth may make his affection less than welcome. Of course, you want to freshen your cat’s breath, but before you look into kitty breath mints, you might want to make an appointment with your veterinarian.

While post-tuna halitosis is no cause for concern, your cat’s breath should not stink consistently. If you notice unrelenting bad breath, your cat might be suffering from an undetected health issue, such as oral disease or diabetes. If you notice the following smells, have your cat examined by a vet:

What Is Your Cat’s Bad Breath Telling You?

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Three Tips to Care for Your Aging Cat

Cats’ health needs change as they get older, but unlike aging humans, they can’t vocalize complaints about aching bones and stiff joints. It is important for cat owners to exercise extra vigilance when it comes to caring for an aging cat.

Follow these tips to help your feline friend age gracefully:

•    Stay current on vital vaccinations. As a cat grows older, it is essential to keep Cat Flu and Feline Infectious Enteritis in check. Though sometimes tempting to overlook, an older cat has a less efficient immune system and is thus more susceptible to disease. Most older cats will only require booster shots. However, if no vaccinations are on record for a cat, or if you are unsure, you can begin vaccinations at any age.

Three Caring Tips to Keep Your Aging Cat From Becoming a Sourpuss

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Cats’ health needs change as they get older, but unlike aging humans, they can’t vocalize complaints about aching bones and stiff joints. It is important for cat owners to exercise extra vigilance when it comes to caring for an aging cat.

Follow these tips to help your feline friend age gracefully:

* Stay current on vital vaccinations. As a cat grows older, it is essential to keep Cat Flu and Feline Infectious Enteritis in check. Though sometimes tempting to overlook, an older cat has a less efficient immune system and is thus more susceptible to disease. Most older cats will only require booster shots. However, if no vaccinations are on record for a cat, or if you are unsure, you can begin vaccinations at any age.

Vaccinations can be found for Cat Flu, Enteritis, FeLV, Chlamydia, FIP and Rabies in most areas. Consult your veterinarian for specific details.

* Don’t hold your breath on oral health care. According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 70 percent of cats have some form of oral disease by age three — by age 10, it’s safe to presume that cats’ mouths can be rife with infection.

At-home oral care programs are ideal to help address the daily oral hygiene needs of cats. According to most veterinarians, brushing cats’ teeth on a regular basis is the best action to take to promote good oral health. For cats that are a little more temperamental about pet owners or vets touching their teeth, a simple and effective solution can be found using a new type of probiotics, called Teddy’s Pride Oral Care, that have been designed specifically for the oral care needs of cats and dogs (www.MyTeddysPride.com). These probiotics can be used in addition to brushing or as a stand-alone oral care routine.

* Eliminate pesky parasites. Fleas are the most common skin parasite of cats, leaving many cats with an itchy reaction. To prevent flea bites, use a flea spray or flea powder specifically formulated for cats. Internal parasites, like tapeworms and roundworms, distress older cats, particularly those which go outdoors. Most vets recommend that cats be treated for worms every three to six months — indoor-only cats may have a longer lapses between treatments. Always check with your vet for the best possible treatment program.

Three Caring Tips to Keep Your Aging Cat From Becoming a Sourpuss

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – Cats’ health needs change as they get older, but unlike aging humans, they can’t vocalize complaints about aching bones and stiff joints. It is important for cat owners to exercise extra vigilance when it comes to caring for an aging cat.
Follow these tips to help your feline friend age gracefully:
* Stay current on vital vaccinations. As a cat grows older, it is essential to keep Cat Flu and Feline Infectious Enteritis in check. Though sometimes tempting to overlook, an older cat has a less efficient immune system and is thus more susceptible to disease. Most older cats will only require booster shots. However, if no vaccinations are on record for a cat, or if you are unsure, you can begin vaccinations at any age.
Vaccinations can be found for Cat Flu, Enteritis, FeLV, Chlamydia, FIP and Rabies in most areas. Consult your veterinarian for specific details.
* Don’t hold your breath on oral health care. According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 70 percent of cats have some form of oral disease by age three — by age 10, it’s safe to presume that cats’ mouths can be rife with infection.
At-home oral care programs are ideal to help address the daily oral hygiene needs of cats. According to most veterinarians, brushing cats’ teeth on a regular basis is the best action to take to promote good oral health. For cats that are a little more temperamental about pet owners or vets touching their teeth, a simple and effective solution can be found using a new type of probiotics, called Teddy’s Pride Oral Care, that have been designed specifically for the oral care needs of cats and dogs (www.MyTeddysPride.com). These probiotics can be used in addition to brushing or as a stand-alone oral care routine.
* Eliminate pesky parasites. Fleas are the most common skin parasite of cats, leaving many cats with an itchy reaction. To prevent flea bites, use a flea spray or flea powder specifically formulated for cats. Internal parasites, like tapeworms and roundworms, distress older cats, particularly those which go outdoors. Most vets recommend that cats be treated for worms every three to six months — indoor-only cats may have a longer lapses between treatments. Always check with your vet for the best possible treatment program.

Sweeten the Kitty: Tips for Easier Traveling with Pets

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – You look forward to your vacation, but leaving your furry friends behind is more than you can handle. Luckily, it’s easier than ever to bring your pets along for the ride.
There are plenty of pet -friendly lodging establishments, restaurants, and a slew of gear and other pet products that make traveling with Fido and Fluffy more comfortable. Consider trying the following tips before packing your pets’ travel bags:
* Plan ahead. Prepare to include your pets in the fun by making a list of the extra gear and supplies that you will need and any special reservations that you may require. Include food, litter, leashes, toys, beds, medications and pet carriers. Just to be safe, carry notes regarding your pet’s medical history and your veterinarian’s contact information.
* Have a practice round. If your pet is not used to car or plane travel, introduce him to the carrier prior to departure. Toss in a favorite toy or familiar object and take a spin around the block. Make sure that the carrier is airline-compliant and sturdy enough to make the trip.
* Travel green. Leaving home does not have to mean abandoning planet-friendly habits. Use biodegradable waste disposal bags when cleaning up after your pooch. If traveling with a cat, use a cat litter that offers odor control, clumping for easy clean-up and all-natural, flushable ingredients, such as World’s Best Cat Litter (www.worldsbestcatlitter.com).
* Keep moving. Just like humans, your pets need as much exercise away from home as they do in their own environment. Make sure you make plenty of stops along the way and allow every member of your family to stretch his or her legs and breathe fresh air. Once at your destination, include your pet in hikes, walks on the beach or a visit to a local park.
* Drink up. Make sure that your pet has access to clean water throughout your travels. A pet’s body is comprised of 80 percent water– proper hydration is key to good health at home and on the road.
* Have fun. Enjoy this extra-special time with your pet. Include him or her in your vacation photo album. Visit a local dog park. It’s likely that your pet will “introduce you” to new friends along the way.

Treating Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma: How One Woman Achieved Remission

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – This year, nearly 66,000 Americans will be diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) — a cancer of the lymphatic system — and between 30 and 40 percent of these patients will have indolent NHL, a slowly developing form that is difficult to treat because patients are prone to relapse after therapy.

Thankfully, there have been a number of advances in treating NHL. Recently, a study published in the journal Cancer showed that a chemotherapy called TREANDA (bendamustine HCl) for Injection produced durable responses in patients with indolent B-cell NHL whose disease had progressed within six months of treatment with a therapy called rituximab as a component.

This is good news for patients like 65-year-old Arlington, Texas, resident Eunice Kendall. In March 2008, Eunice began feeling pain in her back, and attributed it to arthritis. When the pain did not subside, she was referred to Dr. Sohail Akbani, a medical oncologist at the Arlington Cancer Center. Results from a CAT scan revealed that Eunice had indolent B-cell NHL.

Dr. Akbani began aggressive treatment for Eunice, including six cycles of a chemotherapy regimen called CHOP, a chemotherapy treatment, plus rituximab, a monoclonal antibody. Following her remission in July 2008, Dr. Akbani began Eunice on a rituximab maintenance therapy.

Despite maintenance therapy, Eunice’s disease progressed. Dr. Akbani discovered this in August 2009 and began a bendamustine-based therapy after discussing treatment options with Eunice.

“When a patient is not responding to a certain therapy, we work to identify a treatment that may be the right choice,” said Dr. Akbani. “Although Eunice was hesitant to receive chemotherapy again, I believed a bendamustine-based therapy would be an effective and tolerable option for her.”

After receiving treatment with the bendamustine-based therapy, Eunice achieved remission. Individual results may vary.

Eunice has maintained her sense of humor and positive outlook on life and is very thankful for her health. Her days are now spent with her granddaughters, working in her garden, cheering on the Dallas Cowboys, and visiting family and friends.

“I’m only 65 years old,” she says. “I’ve got a lot of living left to do.”