What Is Your Cat’s Bad Breath Telling You?

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – In my practice, I’ve always used probiotics in general -; as animals need probiotics just like humans. Adding beneficial bacteria to a pet’s diet helps the digestive system combat intestinal parasites and improves digestive function.
The gastrointestinal tract is such an important foundation to pets’ immune systems because the gut is an entry point for pathogens. If you’re using probiotics, the immune system is supported and strengthened to fight infection quickly and aggressively. Probiotics also help stop the immune system from over-reacting and creating inflammation.
One common issue for pets is ear infection. I’ve observed that whether we used conventional or alternative treatments, adding a probiotic product for immune system support shortens the length and reduces the severity of the infection. I usually see a better outcome by adding Del-Immune V (www.delimmune.com) to treatment, and generally don’t need to do additional treatments, as is common with ear infections.
Another common issue with pets is skin problems, including mange. I have found that skin problems improve quickly with a probiotic product, like Del-Immune V. I use it for immune system support with all types of mange, including the problematic demodectic mange. Some animals have genetically inherited immune weaknesses that allow mange-inducing mites to overgrow. Dogs can inherit the mites from their parents. You will know the mites are out of control if mange becomes a problem.
Probiotics help immensely by supporting the immune system in mounting an appropriate response to the mange mites. Traditional treatments for mange can include strong antibiotics and dips in toxic medicines. But many dogs, if provided a good diet and Del-Immune V, can get over it on their own — unless the infection is too severe. Most dogs survive with veterinary intervention, but if severe enough, mange can be fatal.
See your local veterinarian if your pet begins to display any symptoms.

Prepare for Mistletoe: Keep Your Breath Fresh

The holidays bring culinary delights, ranging from sparking cocktails to potato latkes to Yule logs. Many bemoan the effects of extra calories when it comes to pants sizes, but few consider what all that celebrating does to the mouth.

Every time we eat sugary foods, we feed the destructive bacteria that live in our mouths. As the bacteria chow down, they release an acid. The acid wears down tooth enamel, leading to cavities and eventually to gum disease. As gum disease is the number-one cause of halitosis, or bad breath, indulging in too many hearty nogs and sugar cookies could leave you standing alone under the mistletoe.

Is Your Cat’s Bad Breath Saying Something?

How many times has your cat come to wake you up by rubbing his face against your face in the morning? Your cat looks adorable, but the odor coming from his mouth may make his affection less than welcome. Of course, you want to freshen your cat’s breath, but before you look into kitty breath mints, you might want to make an appointment with your veterinarian.

While post-tuna halitosis is no cause for concern, your cat’s breath should not stink consistently. If you notice unrelenting bad breath, your cat might be suffering from an undetected health issue, such as oral disease or diabetes. If you notice the following smells, have your cat examined by a vet:

Allergies Could Be Causing Your Bad Breath

If you find that your sniffling, sneezing and runny eyes are accompanied by mouth odor, you’re not alone; seasonal allergies are associated with halitosis, or bad breath.

Bad breath is caused by the same destructive bacteria that cause plaque and gum disease. They live in the mouth, where they feed on carbohydrates consumed as food. In a healthy mouth, these bacteria are kept in check by saliva production. Saliva washes away the bacteria, so they have less time to stick to teeth, eat sugar and emit smelly gas as a byproduct.

Probiotics May Boost Oral Health

If yogurt sales are any indication, Americans have accepted the idea that probiotic foods – those that contain beneficial bacteria – can improve health. But “good” bacteria don’t just live in the digestive system. Now, one company has developed a probiotic mint that can promote optimal oral health.

The human mouth teems with bacteria. But contrary to popular belief, not all of those bacteria are to blame for bad breath and tooth decay. Good bacteria actually promote better oral health – they keep gums healthy and breath fresh. It’s only when “bad” bacteria overpopulate the mouth that mouth odor, tooth decay and gum disease occur.

Is Your Pet’s Bad Breath Dogging You?

Five words or less
(NewsUSA) – Your pet is a beloved family member. You buy him comfy pillows and squeaky toys, premium kibble and trips to the groomer. But if you’re like most …

Puppy Love Without Doggie Breath

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<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – Your dog loves to give you kisses, and while you appreciate the puppy love, you could do without the stinky breath. So, you switch your dog to dry food. You feed him dental biscuits. You even go through the messy process of brushing his teeth. And yet, you still have hold your breath every time he licks your face. What’s going on?

Believe it or not, your dog’s breath shouldn’t smell, and if it does, it’s time to think about your dog’s oral health.

Certain diseases, like diabetes or kidney disease, may cause bad breath in dogs. But most bad breath, or halitosis, occurs when bacteria infect the gums. If left unchecked, the bacteria can create gum disease or go through the gums into the bloodstream, thereby entering other parts of the body.

“Logically, improving the health of your pet’s teeth and gums will help eliminate the halitosis associated with bacterial infection,” says Dr. Jeffrey Hillman, D.M.D., Ph.D. and chief medical officer for Oragenics.

Eliminating bad breath -; and the harmful bacteria that cause it -; begins at home, with a consistent oral health program. But toothbrushing can be irksome for both pet and pet owner, and dental chews can’t reach every tooth surface. For this reason, Hillman, who has studied probiotics for 25 years, first at the Harvard-affiliated Forsyth Institute in Boston and then at the University of Florida, suggests that pet owners give their pets probiotics, or “good” bacteria.

The science behind probiotics is simple -; if your dog’s teeth are coated in good bacteria, there’s no room for bad bacteria to grow. “The good bacteria inhibit the growth of the damaging bad bacteria, leading to better breath,” explains Hillman.

Hillman created ProBiora3, a special blend of oral probiotics that replenish specific “good bacteria” in the mouth. These beneficial bacteria freshen breath and whiten teeth through the natural release of low-level hydrogen peroxide.

ProBiora3 is available to pets in a grooming aid called Teddy’s Pride. You simply sprinkle the probiotics on your pet’s food once daily. Because it’s easy to administer, you’ll have no problem sticking to the program. Teddy’s Pride won’t change the taste, texture or odor of your pet’s kibble — your dog will happily lap it up. And when he kisses you in appreciation, you won’t have to hold your breath or turn away.

For more information, visit www.ForTeddysPride.com.