The Man Behind the Clothing

While the ‘60s may not have exactly been known for fashion (think psychedelic colors and mismatching patterns), it was also the decade that gave us the miniskirt, the bikini and skinny jeans.

In fact, one could argue that was when popular fashion was born—and when Canadian designer Peter Nygard first got his start.

Fast forward to present day, and Nygard has built his empire, Nygard International, not on the likes of those pieces that float down the runway at New York Fashion Week, but rather on collections that are timeless, well-tailored and affordable.

“I am not into avant-garde fashion,” Nygard said in an interview with Women’s Wear Daily. Instead, Nygard’s lines target women over 25.

While the fit of a garment remains paramount, the turn of the century also has seen changes to the types of fabric and material used. To this end, the Winnipeg-based company produces many of its lines—from evening wear to cozy cotton street wear—in stain-resistant, wrinkle-free materials that are guaranteed to fit every woman.

Comments on Nygard’s Facebook page attest to the designer’s obsession with the “perfect fit” for all woman regardless of size. Whether you are a curvy petite, someone who slips into a size 10 or 12 with ease, or a woman with more (or fewer) curves, Nygard guarantees that his company has something for everyone.

“Everyday people are size 14 [and] are 5-foot-4 or 5-foot-6. They do not have perfect figures [but] they want to be fashionable like … models. They want to look slimmer, younger, prettier, but normally people don’t cater to them. We cater to them,” Nygard said in an interview.

Currently, Nygard produces his lines for retail chains such as Sears and Dillard’s, along with operating 160 of its own stores north of the 49th parallel.

For more information on Nygard International, visit www.nygard.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/nygard?sk=info.

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