Community Workshops Focus on Preventing Youth Sports Injuries

CrowdfundedWorkshopsAs a parent, you want to prevent your kids from being hurt playing sports. Now you can.

Athletic TIPS (Towards Injury Prevention in Sports) has teamed up with Global Giving — the largest global crowdfunding site for not-for-profits — to help advance one of its key missions: hosting community workshops across the country to better educate young athletes, their parents and advisers on ways to foster “a safer experience” for everyone playing sports at the kindergarten through college levels.

The workshops focus on:
• Concussions
• Nutrition
• Dehydration and heat-related conditions
• Musculoskeletal injuries

Nonprofit Seeks to Bring Attention to Preventing Sports Injuries

PlayHurtCIt’s considered a “silent epidemic” and it’s threatening our nation’s youth.

We’re talking about sports-related injuries. Every day nearly 8,000 young athletes sustain injuries bad enough to send them to an emergency room, and, if that’s not upsetting enough, take a look at these statistics from the National Athletic Trainers’ Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

• In the past year alone, 48 youths died due to sports injuries.
• About 30,000 high school athletes are hospitalized every year.
• Concussions account for 90 percent of high schoolers’ 300,000 annual head injuries.

4 Things to Bring With You to Enjoy Any Sporting Event

How ‘bout them Cowboys?! As pre-season gets into full swing and America gears up for the upcoming football season, sports fans are prepping their barbecues and coolers for tailgating and partying to celebrate the country’s most popular sport.

Indeed, the end of summer is signaled by cooler weather, the start of football and the close of baseball, as it heads into the home stretch for the playoffs. Wherever your sports heart lies—be it with football, baseball, basketball or hockey—there’s a code of conduct when you’re supporting your favorite team at the next home game. In fact, there’s an unspoken rule for fans everywhere: Be passionate about your team, but not obnoxious.SpittoonSports

Accessories That Are Easy, Convenient and Portable

HandyAccessoriesSome of your favorite accessories are the ones you reach for again and again, those items that are portable, easy, and convenient. When shopping for accessories for everyday use, special events, or travel, several factors stand out. The following tips will help you identify accessories that will make your life easier.

    • Easy. Ease of use is a top consideration in everyone’s favorite, go-to accessories. Be it a wallet with just the right number of slots, a purse with pockets in just the right place, or a smartphone case that doubles as an ID holder, the right accessories make your life easier. If you’re a smokeless tobacco user, a portable spittoon that can be open and shut with one hand makes it easy to enjoy smokeless tobacco on the go. The portable spittoon from Atlanta-based FLASR features a one-hand operational design for ease of use.

Shooting Down Your Hunting To-Do List

SpittoonHuntingCAlthough hunting season may still be a couple of months away, now is the time to start checking things off your hunting to-do list. After all, no matter how you slice it, there is a lot of work that goes into getting ready for the season.

Thankfully, for today’s hunter, things have changed drastically from previous decades. It used to be that hunters slept in tents, heated tin cans of beans over an open fire, wore puffy down parkas to keep warm and stayed near paved roads in case they needed help.

Baseball Chews Over Smokeless Tobacco

TobaccoBaseballCSmokeless tobacco is as much a part of baseball as hot dogs and the Cubs’ disappointing run at the World Series year after year.

While Major League Baseball is asking players to reconsider a habit as old as the sport itself, there is also history to think about — one that has linked the two together in the hearts and minds of Americans.

It would be natural to then ask: Is there life to baseball without smokeless tobacco?

To answer that question means to look at the history of smokeless tobacco and how it and sport have become intertwined.

It’s All About That Bass — Fishing, That Is

TheAllAboutBassC days of seeing someone walking down a road with a stick, some string and a bucket of worms  are as much a part of American culture as hot dogs, baseball and warm apple pie. Since that time, anglers now have many choices this summer, depending on where they’ll be fishing.

While selecting your gear is half the fun, set aside the rods, reels, jigs, rigs and tackle box, and don’t forget these equally important, but oft-overlooked items:

Minor Leaguer Caught New Dream After Outfield Collision

When Chicago White Sox minor-leaguer Greg Shepard remembers his life-altering sports injury in 2000 where he slammed into the left centerfield wall chasing a fly ball, his words are simple.

“The wall won.”

The next morning, Shepard woke up virtually paralyzed. “I couldn’t lift my body out of bed, turn my head or move my right arm,” says Shepard. Naturally, his wife at the time wanted to rush him to the emergency room straightaway. But Shepard had something else in mind.

“I told her,” he recalls, “to ‘open the telephone book and find me a chiropractor.’”

On the Run With Professional Marathoner Stephanie Rothstein

If her goal of making the 2016 Olympic marathon team was to be realized, Rothstein first had to address two recurring medical problems.

Dogsled Racer Blazes Trail for Visually Impaired Readers and Cyclists

Rachael Scdoris, a 28-year-old outdoors enthusiast, has been a competitive dogsled racer for well over a decade. Thanks to the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS), a division of the Library of Congress, she’s been an avid reader for the past year.

Scdoris was born and raised in the wilderness of Bend, Ore., where she traversed mountains and deserts on the back of a sled with her father, who spent 36 years as a musher—a trail his stubborn daughter was determined to follow no matter what. Scdoris was born with a rare vision disorder called congenital achromatopsia, robbing her of colors, distinct shapes and many layers of depth. But her flat, fuzzy world was more of a challenge for others and their misconceptions than for her.