Homeowners Left With Massive Repairs After Hurricane

Now that flood waters from Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have receded, what is left behind? Destroyed homes and damage to thousands of residences in Texas, Florida and Georgia with a giant price tag. Moody’s Analytics expects that cost to exceed $150 billion, on par with that of Hurricane Katrina.

Hurricane Harvey hit Texas as a Category 4 with winds at 132 mph. Hurricane Irma sustained winds of 185 mph for 37 hours, left millions without power, and destroyed one out of every four homes in parts of Florida.

PepsiCo Recycling Helps College Students Take Sustainability to the Next Level

College campuses are not just about education: they want to encourage students to make a difference. And PepsiCo wants to help make that happen.

According to PepsiCo, “Simple acts lead to a big impact.” The company, for the second year in a row, is assisting colleges and universities in reaching their environmental goals by giving students the chance to win up to $10,000 in funding to implement new sustainability initiatives or improve existing efforts in their communities.

The Zero Impact Fund (ZIF), which launched in August 2016, provides cash prizes for college and university sustainability projects related to energy, waste or water that aim to achieve long-term environmental, economic and social impacts.

Help for Homeowners On the Hook for Billions in Hurricane Damages

(NewsUSA) – Sponsored by GAF – And now comes the arduous task of rebuilding hundreds of thousands of houses destroyed or damaged by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.And with it, alas, the realization by all too many homeowners that they’re the ones on the hook for the cost of a large chunk of their own repair work.The main reason? In a word: flooding.While areas like the Florida Keys were decimated by winds that reached 130 mph — a quarter of all houses there were demolished and another 65 percent suffered major damage — a lot of the wreckage from this summer’s double wallop came from floodwaters. And since homeowners’ insurance policies typically cover wind and hail but exclude (you guessed it) flood damage. . .Well, even given the miscellany of federal, state and local aid programs out there, you can see why some estimate the total out-of-pocket costs for Texas and Florida homeowners at $28 billion and $13.1 billion respectively."There’s going to be a huge uninsured economic loss here," Pete Mills, a senior vice president at the Mortgage Bankers Association, has said.As in past emergencies, fellow Americans immediately joined a long list of companies like Apple, Verizon, and Chevron in donating truckloads of money, clothes, and other products to help with the relief efforts.One of the latest corporate initiatives seems especially apt, given all those houses that need to be rebuilt.In what it says is a first-of-its kind program for them, GAF, North America’s largest roofing manufacturer, is offering a special financing program for homeowners in need of roof repairs in FEMA-designated areas for individual assistance of Texas, Florida, and Georgia. Through November 30, 2017, they can take advantage of zero percent interest over 36 months of equal payments."The hurricanes have had a devastating impact on so many people," said Jim Schnepper, president of GAF. "We recognize that restoring communities begins with getting homeowners back into their homes as quickly as possible, with a roof they can trust to protect the things that matter most in their lives."Know that the financing is available only through GAF factory-certified contractors, who can be located through the company’s website at gaf.com/rebuild.

Outdoor Living Space Is Becoming An Extension of The Indoor

Homeowners want to spend a lot more time in their outdoor spaces today and, thanks to modernized, attractive outdoor lighting, the enjoyment doesn’t have to end when the sun goes down. The American Lighting Association (ALA) is on top of the trend to turn a patio, deck or other outdoor area into an additional family room, with all the modern amenities and furnishings.

“People want to extend their indoor living space outside, and still have the same quality of finishes outside as inside,” says Rick Seidman, president and CEO of Quoizel, Inc. “They’re putting rugs, televisions and furniture outside, so we almost have to treat [outside] decorative lighting as if it’s interior.”

Outdoor Living – Bringing the Inside Out

(NewsUSA) – Enjoying your outside space does not have to take place on a dimly lit patio with moderately comfortable furniture devoid of fine furnishings and sophisticated style. According to the American Lighting Association (ALA), outdoor living can be just as entertaining, high-tech and classy as life inside your home.Regardless of the season, it is becoming common to turn a patio, deck or outdoor space into an additional family room with modern amenities and beautiful furnishings. ALA-member lighting manufacturers are making this transition easier with expanded lines of decorative lighting rated for all-weather use.Hinkley Lighting’s CEO Rick Wiedemer, CLC, explains how the trend of accessorizing outdoor areas with traditionally indoor lighting products has gained momentum over the last several years. "It started with landscape lighting and then moved into sconces, wall sconces, and now pendants and chandeliers," Wiedemer says.It’s fairly commonplace to use sconces to highlight doorways and step lights to define spaces; today’s homeowners are also hanging elaborate chandeliers and colorful pendants over outside tables. Spotlights can be seen above grills and downlights under covered patios.With a little creativity and imagination, just about anything goes. And the demand is increasing for those fixtures to mimic the styles and attention to detail traditionally found indoors."People want to extend their indoor living space outside, and still have the same quality of finishes outside as inside," says Rick Seidman, president and CEO of Quoizel, Inc. "They’re putting rugs, televisions and furniture outside, so we almost have to treat [outside] decorative lighting as if it’s interior."Just because the newest outdoor lighting fixtures are beautiful, don’t assume they lack the engineering to withstand harsh temperatures and extreme weather. High-quality outdoor fixtures are designed for reliability and endurance."One of the things consumers are concerned about when shopping for lighting is durability," says Seidman. "It really has to be able to withstand the elements. With new technology, fixture finishes are actually built into the material so that it weathers beautifully."Wiedemer concurs."You want to have something that’s meant to be in the weather. Normally a rustic finish fixture will weather better," he says. "The principal thing these are engineered for is to be rained upon. Rain will not collect inside the fixture, it will drain out…. A typical interior fixture is not made that way."The latest all-weather lighting is at your local ALA-member showroom.For a listing of showrooms or to view outdoor lighting videos, go to americanlightingassoc.com

Outdoor Living ? Bringing the Inside Out

(NewsUSA) – Enjoying your outside space does not have to take place on a dimly lit patio with moderately comfortable furniture devoid of fine furnishings and sophisticated style. According to the American Lighting Association (ALA), outdoor living can be just as entertaining, high-tech and classy as life inside your home. Regardless of the season, it is becoming common to turn a patio, deck or outdoor space into an additional family room with modern amenities and beautiful furnishings. ALA-member lighting manufacturers are making this transition easier with expanded lines of decorative lighting rated for all-weather use. Hinkley Lighting’s CEO Rick Wiedemer, CLC, explains how the trend of accessorizing outdoor areas with traditionally indoor lighting products has gained momentum over the last several years. “It started with landscape lighting and then moved into sconces, wall sconces, and now pendants and chandeliers,” Wiedemer says. It’s fairly commonplace to use sconces to highlight doorways and step lights to define spaces; today’s homeowners are also hanging elaborate chandeliers and colorful pendants over outside tables. Spotlights can be seen above grills and downlights under covered patios. With a little creativity and imagination, just about anything goes. And the demand is increasing for those fixtures to mimic the styles and attention to detail traditionally found indoors. “People want to extend their indoor living space outside, and still have the same quality of finishes outside as inside,” says Rick Seidman, president and CEO of Quoizel, Inc. “They’re putting rugs, televisions and furniture outside, so we almost have to treat [outside] decorative lighting as if it’s interior.” Just because the newest outdoor lighting fixtures are beautiful, don’t assume they lack the engineering to withstand harsh temperatures and extreme weather. High-quality outdoor fixtures are designed for reliability and endurance. “One of the things consumers are concerned about when shopping for lighting is durability,” says Seidman. “It really has to be able to withstand the elements. With new technology, fixture finishes are actually built into the material so that it weathers beautifully.” Wiedemer concurs.”You want to have something that’s meant to be in the weather. Normally a rustic finish fixture will weather better,” he says. “The principal thing these are engineered for is to be rained upon. Rain will not collect inside the fixture, it will drain out…. A typical interior fixture is not made that way.” The latest all-weather lighting is at your local ALA-member showroom. For a listing of showrooms or to view outdoor lighting videos, go to americanlightingassoc.com.

Outdoor Living – Bringing the Inside Out

(NewsUSA) – Enjoying your outside space does not have to take place on a dimly lit patio with moderately comfortable furniture devoid of fine furnishings and sophisticated style. According to the American Lighting Association (ALA), outdoor living can be just as entertaining, high-tech and classy as life inside your home.Regardless of the season, it is becoming common to turn a patio, deck or outdoor space into an additional family room with modern amenities and beautiful furnishings. ALA-member lighting manufacturers are making this transition easier with expanded lines of decorative lighting rated for all-weather use.Hinkley Lighting’s CEO Rick Wiedemer, CLC, explains how the trend of accessorizing outdoor areas with traditionally indoor lighting products has gained momentum over the last several years. "It started with landscape lighting and then moved into sconces, wall sconces, and now pendants and chandeliers," Wiedemer says.It’s fairly commonplace to use sconces to highlight doorways and step lights to define spaces; today’s homeowners are also hanging elaborate chandeliers and colorful pendants over outside tables. Spotlights can be seen above grills and downlights under covered patios.With a little creativity and imagination, just about anything goes. And the demand is increasing for those fixtures to mimic the styles and attention to detail traditionally found indoors."People want to extend their indoor living space outside, and still have the same quality of finishes outside as inside," says Rick Seidman, president and CEO of Quoizel, Inc. "They’re putting rugs, televisions and furniture outside, so we almost have to treat [outside] decorative lighting as if it’s interior."Just because the newest outdoor lighting fixtures are beautiful, don’t assume they lack the engineering to withstand harsh temperatures and extreme weather. High-quality outdoor fixtures are designed for reliability and endurance."One of the things consumers are concerned about when shopping for lighting is durability," says Seidman. "It really has to be able to withstand the elements. With new technology, fixture finishes are actually built into the material so that it weathers beautifully."Wiedemer concurs."You want to have something that’s meant to be in the weather. Normally a rustic finish fixture will weather better," he says. "The principal thing these are engineered for is to be rained upon. Rain will not collect inside the fixture, it will drain out…. A typical interior fixture is not made that way."The latest all-weather lighting is at your local ALA-member showroom.For a listing of showrooms or to view outdoor lighting videos, go to americanlightingassoc.com

Five Tips You Need To Know Now To Avoid Getting Scammed By Roofing Contractors

(Sponsored by GAF) The Better Business Bureau says it is one of the biggest scams being perpetrated on homeowners, according to its new Scam Tracker Annual Risk Report.

A man knocks on your door and claims to have leftover roofing materials from another job nearby. He then offers to fix yours for nothing.

If this sounds too good to be true, it is.

The scammer — who loves to show up in those neighborhoods ravaged by storms — takes your money without doing the promised work — or very little of it.

High-Tech Tools Preview Roof Repairs

The home improvement industry has embraced the digital age; online virtual-reality tools allow homeowners to easily preview, plan, and choose options for all types of remodeling. The development of these virtual-reality products can help prevent homeowners from making costly mistakes that must be repaired later.

Virtual reality is especially useful when it comes to choosing a roof, which is critical to the curb appeal, comfort, and resale value of a home. GAF’s Virtual Home Remodeler allows users to experiment with a variety of different looks, ranging from French country to Victorian to ranch.

The Millenial Homebuyers are Savvy and Know What They Want

It may be hard to believe, but not all of the 18- to-35-year-old generation is so weighed down with college debt that they’re living in their parents’ basements. Contrary to popular perception, the Millennials are driving home sales. In fact, the National Association of Realtors just recognized them as the largest segment of the homebuyer market at 35 percent — up from 32 percent in 2014 — in its most recent 2016 “Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends Study.”
“The coming years of housing demand will be Millennial-driven and will support the single-family sector,” Dennis Lockhart, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, says. Given that new reality, here are four things experts say Millennials desire most in a house. Keep these in mind because you will most likely be selling to a younger buyer.