Heading to The Hospital? Get Better, Don’t Get A Blood Clot

(NewsUSA) – Spending time in the hospital can be a challenge, and the last thing you need is another setback on your road to recovery. This is why it is so important to know that being in the hospital – particularly if you are dealing with surgery, a physical trauma, or a serious illness like cancer – places you at increased risk for the development of a deadly blood clot.Each year, blood clots affect about 900,000 people in the United States, and about half of all blood clots occur during a hospital stay or within three months of a hospital stay or surgery.Many blood clots occurring during or after hospitalization can be prevented, but fewer than half of hospital patients receive proper prevention measures. This is why the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Blood Clot Alliance advise that you have a blood clot prevention plan when headed to and home from the hospital.Your Blood Clot Prevention PlanFollow these steps to help prevent blood clots:* Before entering the hospital, discuss all of your risk factors with your doctor, including your personal and family history of blood clots.* Ask if you will need prevention measures for blood clots while in the hospital.* Before leaving the hospital, ask your doctor what to do at home to prevent blood clots.* Ask about the signs or symptoms of a blood clot and what to do if you experience them. Signs and Symptoms of a Blood ClotBlood clots occur most often in the legs or arms, and symptoms include:* Swelling* Pain or tenderness* Skin that may be warm to the touch, red, or discoloredBlood clots in your legs or arms can travel to your lungs, which can be deadly. Symptoms of blood clots in your lungs include:* Difficulty breathing* Chest pain that worsens with a deep breath* Coughing up blood* Faster than normal or irregular heartbeatWhen released from the hospital and you return home, follow all instructions and take medications as prescribed. Get up and move around as often as possible. If confined to bed or unable to move, ask a family member or friend to help you move. Seek immediate medical attention if you experience signs or symptoms.For more information, visit www.stoptheclot.org/spreadtheword

New Books Offer Retirees The Way To Plan For Retirement

(NewsUSA) – Social Security, Medicare and supplemental insurance, long-term care, IRAs, life insurance, post-retirement investments and income taxes can all affect the success of your retirement. To that end, an easy-to-understand book and workbook are now available to help guide you in this process."The Complete Cardinal Guide to Planning for and Living in Retirement," an Amazon bestseller, and the accompanying workbook, written by Hans E. Scheil, CFP, can answer your questions about retirement, such as:* When do I?start my Social Security check?* How do I?supplement Medi-care?* Should I purchase Long-Term Care Insurance?*What should I do with my IRA or 401(k)?* Am I investing and creating enough income in retirement?* What about income taxes after age 65?* How do I handle life insurance and transferring assets to children and grandchildren?* How do I choose financial and legal professionals to help me?Long-term care planning is one subject both books explain in depth. The average annual cost for nursing home care is $85,755 and in-home care is $49,192, according to Genworth. This cost can go on for years and many retirees, as well as their adult children, do not have a plan to pay for this. There are options available for covering long-term care, which are outlined in the books."The consequences of failing to plan for long-term care are suffered by the family," Scheil says in his book. "I deal with family members all the time who are doing last- minute planning for a client who has just checked into a facility or is receiving care at home. I experience the confusion, fear, anxiety, pain, and disappointment that comes with these situations. The adult children have a tough time with it. Our job at Cardinal is to help people avoid or minimize these challenges."Throughout his 41 years in the financial services industry, Scheil has worked with clients age 65- plus to provide them with the financial solutions they need to have a successful retirement. He also shares his experience caring for his mother, father and grandmother in their later years.In his books, Scheil addresses the major problems retirees can face and provides simple strategies that can be put in place with the help of a qualified professional.Scheil is a Certified Financial Planner professional who accepts speaking engagements to help educate the public on the basics of planning for retirement. Hans serves clients in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.To get the books, visit Amazon.com or your local library. To get more information, call (919) 535-8261 or go to CardinalGuide.com

New Music Video Warns of Stroke Signs

(NewsUSA) – The American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA), the world’s leading voluntary health organization devoted to fighting cardiovascular disease and stroke, is releasing a new parody music video to teach people how to recognize the most common stroke warning signs.Worldwide, stroke is the no. 2 cause of death and a leading cause of serious disability. For the American Stroke Association, raising awareness of stroke is more critical than ever, as new reports indicate that stroke deaths are on the rise.The song is a parody of the well-known Y.M.C.A song from the 70’s. It features a person having a stroke in a diner and the patrons and staff singing about the acronym, F.A.S.T., an easy way to teach people the most common stroke warning signs and to call 9-1-1 during a stroke emergency."The majority of stroke patients still do not arrive at the Emergency Department quickly enough to receive the care that can dramatically improve their outcomes, in large part because they or those around them do not recognize the warning signs and the importance of calling 9-1-1," says Dr. Mitchell Elkind, chair of the American Stroke Association and professor of Neurology and Epidemiology at Columbia University."The song is intended to be a lighthearted way of helping people remember F.A.S.T. and to encourage them to call 9-1-1 when someone is experiencing any stroke symptoms."The acronym, F.A.S.T., stands for:* Face Drooping -; Does one side of the face droop or is it numb? Ask the person to smile. Is the person’s smile uneven?* Arm Weakness -; Is one arm weak or numb? Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?* Speech Difficulty -; Is speech slurred? Is the person unable to speak or difficult to understand? Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence, such as "The sky is blue."* Time to Call 9-1-1 -; If someone shows any of these symptoms, even if the symptoms go away, call 9-1-1 and get to a hospital immediately. (Tip: Check the time so you’ll know when the first symptoms appeared.)"With today’s advanced technology, stroke is more treatable than ever before," says Lee H. Schwamm, M.D., executive vice chair of Neurology at Massachusetts General Hospital and American Stroke Association spokesperson."There are treatments that can help significantly reduce disability and even death in a stroke emergency. Some treatments include drugs that can help dissolve blood clots and medical devices that can remove the clots -; but there’s a narrow window of time in which a person can receive treatment.""When it comes to a stroke emergency, one thing always remains true: urgency in calling 9-1-1 is critical. There is no technology that can substitute for time loss. Without oxygen-rich blood, brain cells die. So time loss is brain loss. Receiving immediate, professional help can get you the immediate treatment to greatly improve recovery outcomes," says Schwamm.Education about F.A.S.T is a part of the American Stroke Association’s Together to End Stroke initiative, nationally sponsored by Medtronic. Together, the two organizations aim to help people to easily recognize the stroke warning signs to improve stroke outcomes.For more information and to find a complete list of the stroke warning signs, visit www.StrokeAssociation.org

Lady Gaga Stars in New PSA to Support Education and Inspire Positive Classrooms

(NewsUSA) – Students today face not only academic challenges, but also the emotional challenges of stress brought on by negative classroom environments, according to data from a recent survey by the Sesame Workshop. In the survey, 86 percent of teachers and 70 percent of parents reported worrying that "the world is an unkind place for children."In addition, teachers face financial challenges to making their classrooms places where students can succeed.Data from the Education Market Association show that nearly all public school teachers (99.5 percent) dip into their own money to purchase classroom supplies, and many of them spend as much as $400 per year on basic items.To help ease the burden on teachers and foster an atmosphere of kindness and tolerance in the classroom, Staples, Inc., is partnering with music icon Lady Gaga to create a series of public service announcements.The public service campaign includes 15-, 30- and 60-second TV and radio spots in which Lady Gaga encourages positive behavior and attitudes, as well as support for students and teachers in reaching their educational goals.The PSAs also highlight two charities: DonorsChoose.org, which allows individuals to contribute to more than 25,000 classroom projects for teachers across the country; and the Born This Way Foundation, a nonprofit organization founded by Lady Gaga and her mother, Cynthia Germanotta, to support and empower children, teens, and young adults. As part of its mission to support education, Staples announced donations of $1 million each to DonorsChoose.org and the Born This Way Foundation."I want kids to love themselves, fearlessly," Lady Gaga says in a video on the StaplesforStudents.org website.The lack of basic school supplies is a chronic problem that can get in the way of children’s learning and achieving their goals, she adds.For more information about the campaign and fundraising activities, visit StaplesforStudents.org. Visitors to the site have the opportunity to enter a sweepstakes and win a trip for two to Las Vegas to meet Lady Gaga and see her in concert as part of her 2017 Lady Gaga Joanne tour. Five winners will receive the travel and concert package, and a grand prize winner also receives a $50,000 scholarship, courtesy of Staples. 

The Cowboy Way Highlighted In New TV Series

(NewsUSA) – As mayor of D’Lo, Mississippi, one of John Henry Berry’s recent challenges included tracking down errant employees — goats he had positioned to clip the town’s ball fields had wandered off. The quest for the goats is an example of the quirky challenges facing Mayor Berry and featured in the reality series, "Small Town, Big Mayor," airing on UP TV on Thursdays at 9:30 p.m. Eastern time.The series offers a refreshing escape from the negative attitude surrounding much of politics today with a behind-the-scenes look at a hard-working mayor and his family who want to make their town a better place and to help it survive and thrive in the future.The residents of D’Lo include 456 people, as well as 240 cows. Mayor Berry wears multiple hats, serving not only as mayor, but also as town arbitrator, dog catcher, landscaper, sewer repairman, volunteer fireman, high school football announcer, Parish drummer, and 4H Firearms Instructor, to name a few. He also finds time to be the father of five children: Ashley, Ben, Autumn, Preston, and Josh; and husband to Angie.The fourth-generation resident of D’Lo is known for his positive attitude, white suits, and the inclination to drive around town in a golf cart."The love of my town inspired me to run for mayor," says Mayor Berry. "As a native of D’Lo, Miss., I want to improve the town and bring in tourism," he adds. Specific plans to attract tourists include opening a restaurant, he notes.In addition to the restaurant, his goals include legalizing golf carts in D’Lo, making the town more environmentally friendly, putting D’Lo on Kickstarter, building a library, and launching a campaign to recruit new volunteer firemen.Each episode of "Small Town, Big Mayor" will focus on some aspect of his 95-point plan to revitalize the town.In the meantime, Mayor Berry gracefully juggles daily challenges of small-town administrations."There’s nothing I won’t do for D’Lo," says Berry. One surprise: "I had to learn to work on the water well and sewage system to keep things functioning properly without spending money the city didn’t have," he says.Tune in to "Small Town, Big Mayor" for a taste of genuine community spirit as the citizens rally around the mayor. As Mayor Berry says, "We may be tiny, but we have a lot of heart."

Two Decades Strong — Family Place Libraries Celebrate A Milestone

(NewsUSA) – Libraries are no longer just spaces filled with books and movies to borrow. They are places of wonder and imagination and, if they happen to be affiliated with Family Place Libraries (FPL), they are fun, interactive early learning and family support destinations for families with very young children. And they are celebrating their 20th anniversary.The Family Place Libraries initiative began when the former library advocacy organization, Libraries for the Future, was searching the nation for a model parent program that could be replicated in public libraries. A visit to Middle Country Public Library and its Parent/Child Workshop sparked this collaborative project.Family Place Libraries is a nationwide network of children’s librarians who embrace the fact that literacy begins at birth, and that libraries can help build healthy communities by nourishing healthy families. The organization transforms libraries into community centers for early literacy and learning, parent education and engagement, family support and community connectivity, helping to ensure that all children have the foundation they need to succeed.Over the last 20 years, FPL has grown from five to more than 500 sites in 30 states and it keeps growing.The organization has worked hard to build relationships among the librarians and parents, children and community early childhood, health and human services agencies.These libraries offer parents, caregivers and community agencies access to a variety of services and materials: books, toys, DVDs, programs, information and referrals to library and community services (i.e., early intervention, parenting support groups, ESL, citizenship), and guest speakers on a variety of topics. All of these offerings strengthen the bonds between the libraries and the communities they serve.”Family Place brings together the critical elements for families … reading and learning, a relationship with knowledgeable staff equipped with tools to support families, an opportunity to learn in a new way, a place to meet others in the community, and form strong cohort relationships,” says one library director.Evaluation findings from the three-year Institute of Museum and Library Services National Leadership Grant corroborate this.* Partner library directors and librarians became critical communicators and advocates for both the importance of the early childhood years and the role of the library in those years within their local community and library profession;* Active membership in early childhood and family support coalitions increased from 59 percent to 79 percent;* Presentations at local, state and national professional conferences increased from 68 percent to 100 percent.* Seventy percent of community agencies surveyed believed that their agencies have an increased understanding of the needs of families with young children because of the library.* Ninety-five percent of community agencies surveyed see the library as a vital link in supporting families and the early learning of their young children”I have always loved the library, but adding Family Place toys, encouragement for interaction — this has improved my perception,” says one community agency. “It makes it easier to refer families.”Family Place Libraries have become an integral part of communities throughout the country — starting young and looking at the whole child and family to encourage and support learning and identify and address needs to help build and strengthen healthy families.And they look forward to 20 more years.

Rum Aficionados Are in For a Treat with Relaunch, New Label

(NewsUSA) – Rum aficionados, rejoice. A classic brand is re-entering the spotlight with a new look.St. Lucia Distillers is re-launching the Chairman’s Reserve rum in the United States in July 2017, and will unveil new packaging designed to highlight the brand’s distinguished history and reputation for quality blends in the English rum style."Chairman’s Reserve has always been recognized amongst the finest rums in the world," says Benjamin Jones, director of North America for the brand."Now, with an elegant, refreshed look, Chairman’s Reserve will return the spotlight to St. Lucia as an island with a rich and an original legacy for producing world-class rum," he says.The new label for Chairman’s Reserve positions the brand to compete at the premium level in the rum category and compete against premium aged spirits overall, according to a company statement.The Chairman’s Reserve portfolio includes Chairman’s Reserve Rum Original, Chairman’s Reserve Spiced Original, Chairman’s Reserve The Forgotten Casks, and Chairman’s Reserve White Rum.Chairman’s Reserve Rum Original is the flagship St. Lucian rum, created in 1999. Chairman’s Reserve Original combines rums from Coffey column stills and copper pot stills, well blended after maturation and further aged in oak casks.Chairman’s Reserve Spiced Original starts with original Chairman’s Reserve and adds a spicy kick from a Caribbean bark known as "Bois Bande," which has a reputation as an aphrodisiac. Other key ingredients include cinnamon, nutmeg, clove, vanilla, and allspice, as well as lemon and orange peels.The Forgotten Casks of Chairman’s Reserve is formulated to mimic casks of rum that were saved from the St. Lucia Distillers during a fire on May 2, 2007. The casks were misplaced, then rediscovered, but were too old for the Chairman’s Original blend, and the rum was released on its own in the extra-aged category.The product was successful enough for Chairman’s Reserve to regularly hold back some original rum for additional aging and branding as Forgotten Casks.Chairman’s Reserve White Rum features hints of citrus and a blend of three- to four-year-old rums aged in American white oak casks after distillation in copper pot stills and a Coffey still.In addition, "St. Lucia Distillers will re-release the brand, "1931," as a limited reserve expression in the Chairman’s portfolio," according to a company statement. The rare aged rum will be known as "Chairman’s Reserve 1931."For more information about Chairman’s Reserve products and the relaunch, visit spiribam.com

Many Working Moms Can’t Afford Their Health Care Deductible

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – A survey from Aflac and Working Mother magazine found that growing health care deductibles are unaffordable for nearly half of working mothers.

In recent years, medical costs have continued to rise while wages remained stagnant, leaving working mothers with little money on hand to save for their deductibles, causing them to reallocate family funds to cover medical bills. Fortunately, resources like supplemental insurance are available as a financial safety net to help cover out-of-pocket costs because no one should have to choose between paying medical bills and buying groceries for the family.

Learn more at www.aflac.com/workingmother

The Opioid Crisis’ Latest Victims: Addicted Babies

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – And now the nation’s opioid crisis is putting newborn babies at risk.
The use of prescription painkillers like OxyContin by women during pregnancy has resulted in what’s being called “an explosion” of infants as addicted to the drugs as their mothers. Newly published data in JAMA Pediatrics shows the number of cases of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) has risen five-fold in the U.S. from 2000 to 2012 — that’s nearly 22,000 affected infants in that last year alone — and the reality behind those stats is heart-wrenching.
“The babies, they really suffer, just like adults do when they withdraw from narcotics,” Dr. Terrie Inder, chair of pediatric newborn medicine at Boston’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital, told CBS News. “The babies are very irritable and sometimes have high heart rates, sweating, flushing, diarrhea. They cry a lot.”
Heightening experts’ concern:
* The crucial early “bonding” between mother and child is disrupted, given the babies’ average hospital stay of 24 days.
* The mothers — often unaware of the potential collateral damage from the painkillers they’ve been taking — experience what Inder calls “anxiety and guilt.”
Back and neck discomfort is especially common during pregnancy since women’s postural changes can result in spine and pelvic pain. The open question is whether this latest development — combined with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s call last year for physicians to dramatically curtail prescribing opioids — will encourage more women to seek alternatives like drug-free chiropractic care.
“All chiropractors are trained to work with women who are pregnant,” the American Pregnancy Association says, lauding their expertise in “establishing pelvic balance and alignment.”
As the Foundation for Chiropractic Progress notes, visits to highly educated and trained doctors of chiropractic are covered by most insurance and health plans.
Learn more at F4CP.com/findadoctor.

Seniors Find That Doing Good Is Good For You

Five words or less(NewsUSA) – There are two things that older adults have in spades these days: time and knowledge. And both make them the perfect match for volunteering.
By giving back as little as two hours a week, or about 96 hours a year, older adults are discovering how to keep their lives active and healthy.
Research shows that seniors who volunteer can combat depression, stave off chronic pain, and boost brain power. In short, volunteering can promote longevity.
Still need another reason to get out and volunteer? With the number of volunteers age 65 and older expected to double in a few years, chances are you’ll reconnect with old friends and make new ones.
“Volunteering gave me a reason to get up in the morning and stimulated my brain as I learned about topics and issues that were completely unfamiliar to me,” says one volunteer.
To help educate older adults about the benefits of volunteering, the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging (n4a) launched a public education campaign to raise awareness of the issue and to prompt older adults to take action. The centerpiece of the campaign is a publication, “Doing Good Is Good for You: Volunteer!”
This brochure provides you with a Self-Assessment Checklist that can help you evaluate the range of issues and activities that you may find most interesting in a volunteer setting.
For example, are you interested in animals, politics, or art?
Do you enjoy activities such as gardening, tutoring, or counseling?
The Checklist gives you dozens of options.
One prospective volunteer who completed a checklist of his interests was a lifelong musician. He checked “arts and culture” as a favorite and said he loved teaching others. When the local volunteer coordinator signed him up, she had no idea that his instrument of choice was a ukulele. Two years later, his lessons have become so popular, he’s teaching in two senior centers to packed classes.
The point is, there’s a volunteer opportunity for everyone, and it can be found with the simple click of a mouse.
For more information on volunteering, and to download your free copy of the brochure and other resources, visit www.n4a.org and find the “Volunteer Resource Center” under n4a Initiatives.