Pre-Nup Pointers For Your Feet

<b>Pre-Nup Pointers For Your Feet</b>“></td>
<td>
<p>(<a href=NewsUSA) – As a bride prepares for her wedding day, there is a long list of things to do. Book the reception hall. Order the wedding cake. Find the perfect dress. And … take care of her feet.

Many brides will wear shoes that can wreak havoc on their feet. So it’s especially important to pamper them before the big day. Here are some tips from the American Podiatric Medical Association on making your wedding a little easier on the feet:

* Pre-nuptial pampering prep: Fill a bucket with warm water and be sure it is large enough for both of your feet to soak. Remove nail polish with non-acetone polish remover. Stimulate foot circulation and warm up your feet by propping one foot at a time on your lap, grasp the foot and begin slowly moving your thumbs from the top of your toes to the bottom of your heel and back. Use a nail clipper to cut toenails straight across. Then, use an emery board to smooth the nail edges.

* Soothing the soles: After soaking, use a pumice stone or non-metal foot file to gently smooth the skin around the heel and the balls and sides of your feet. (For extra soothing and softening, use a scrub and massage your entire foot and lower leg.) Use a fresh towel to pat feet dry and be sure to dry between each toe. Massage a healthy amount of emollient-enriched skin lotion all over your feet to hydrate the skin and increase circulation.

* Finishing toe touches: Remove the moisturizer from your toenails and in between your toes by using soap and water. Apply polish only if you have healthy nails. While it may make your toes look pretty, nail polish locks out moisture and doesn’t allow the nail or nail bed to “breathe.”

On the eve of your wedding day, lightly wrap cellophane around each foot. The cellophane will act as a makeshift sauna by locking in moisture. By morning, your feet will feel soothingly soft.

People with diabetes should always consult a podiatrist before beginning any foot care regimen. For more tips from the APMA, visit www.apma.org.

Be Sociable, Share!
1 Star - No Good2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars - Great (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...
Be Sociable, Share!

This article is copyright free. You are free to use it on a blog, website, in a newspaper, or newsletter.

To re-post this, copy the content above, or HTML on the right, and paste onto your site.